Search Results: "Stephen J. Whitfield"


BOOK REVIEW

IN SEARCH OF AMERICAN JEWISH CULTURE by Stephen J. Whitfield
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 24, 1999

"If readers can stay with him that long, they may be rewarded for the effort."
Whitfield (American Studies/Brandeis; A Death in the Delta: The Life of Emmett Till, 1988) examines the complex interplay between Jewish newcomers to the US and the culture they helped shape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JO GAR’S CASEBOOK by Raoul Whitfield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 25, 2003

"Black Mask fans will be especially intrigued to find just how quiet stories can be without losing their hardboiled edge."
Although best known as the author of the hardboiled novel Green Ice (1930), Whitfield was in his time (1897-1945) one of the most popular and prolific suppliers of short fiction to Black Mask. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PICKFORD by Eileen Whitfield
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Any record of these losses, even an unremarkable one such as Whitfield's, thus ought to be valued by those who care about film. (60 b&w photos, not seen)"
A capable account of the life and times of one of the greats of the silent-movie era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING'S WRONG WITH YOUR SCALE! by Van Whitfield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Amusing, but little else."
Whitfield's second novel (after Beeperless Remote, 1996), a romantic comedy set in the social swarm of contemporary weight-loss culture, is just about as thin as the characters wish their stomachs were. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"A highly readable exposÇ coupled to a provoking argument. (Author tour)"
A glaring indictment of America's jury system, by the Wall Street Journal's legal editor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PLAN by Stephen J. Cannell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1995

"Early touches of Carl Jung and Joseph Campbell awaken hopes for a superior thriller—but TV scriptwriter Cannell (The Rockford Files, The Commish, etc.) trots out the same old song and dance."
First novel and political thriller about the Mafia setting up an unknown Rhode Island governor to nab the US presidency. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONFESSIONS OF A HERO WORSHIPER by Stephen J. Dubner
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 21, 2003

"Dubner's search may yield what appear to be crumbs, but they're crumbs with flecks of gold."
The search for a childhood hero comes to little, but the reasons behind it are illuminated. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SABRAEL CONFESSION by Stephen J. Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 13, 2015

"A vast, Conan-style saga with an inspiring protagonist who battles demons."
In this religious fantasy debut, an angel chronicles his adventures in heaven and on Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUYS IN SUITS by Van Whitfield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Entertainment Lite: wisecracking and contrived."
Whitfield (Something's Wrong With Your Scale!, 1999, etc.) returns to that trendy urban landscape where would-be cool black guys hang out trying to make the right moves on their women. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN GREAT WATERS by Kit Whitfield
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"Refreshingly unusual work from a writer to watch."
Whitfield (Benighted, 2006) delivers a tale of royal intrigue and undersea fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAVERICK HEART by Stephen J. May
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"A fine job: May's attentions may well inspire new interest in Grey's largely forgotten work."
A well-crafted biography of the western writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 17, 1992

"Clear and well-researched: an invaluable history for those interested in one of the more fascinating forms of the American religious experience. (Fifty-seven illustrations—not seen.)"
An unusually comprehensive and eminently readable chronicle of more than two centuries of Shaker life, from its rough beginning in the late 18th century to its diminished yet still significant presence today. Read full book review >