Search Results: "Stephen R. Donaldson"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1987

"Mordant's Need resembles the thousands of three-decker idylls that once filled 19th-century home libraries—huge, purple entertainments whose breeziness and sweetness Filled a passing need but now lack the least murmur of life."
The conclusion of Donaldson's two-volume fantasy epic, Mordant's Need, begun with Mirror of Her Dreams (1986). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOUNDED LAND by Stephen R. Donaldson
Released: June 16, 1980

"Wretched."
Donaldson's trilogy The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever (1977), though a work of less saccharine escapism than most heroic fantasies, cannot be said to merit a sequel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REAVE THE JUST by Stephen R. Donaldson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 1999

"Even his critics are due for a wonderful surprise: these thoughtful, well worked-out, often fascinating yarns are largely free of the preposterous weight, impossible convolutions, and tormented prose that make the novels so troublesome."
Donaldson's first collection since Daughter of Regals (1983), though, of the eight substantial stories here, 1984—98, five have appeared previously in other volumes—the title piece in After the King (1992); "The Djinn Who Watches Over the Accursed" in Arabesques 2 (1989); "The Kings of Tarshish Shall Bring Gifts" in The Book of Kings (1995); "The Woman Who Loved Pigs" in Full Spectrum 4 (1993); and "What Makes Us Human" in Berserker Base (1985). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAN WHO FOUGHT ALONE by Stephen R. Donaldson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"Clichéd, chop-soggy whodunit that might be tough love for fans of Donaldson's Thomas Covenant and Gap Into Power series."
The well-known science fiction and fantasy author (Reave the Just, 1999, etc.) dons a trenchcoat for what might be the beginning of a hard-boiled detective series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 17, 1977

"Preachier than Tolkien, yet conversely conveying a more sophisticated sense of moral complexities, Donaldson's trilogy is a Hawed and erratic work, but not an inconsiderable one."
Heroic fantasy stalks our anti-heroic age as if bent on providing a thesis for every cultural sociologist in the land. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AGAINST ALL THINGS ENDING by Stephen R. Donaldson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"If the likes of Cirrus Kindwind, the Lost Deep and She Who Must Not Be Named, and lines such as 'Through the bane's ferocity, she smelled the acrid pulse of unnatural blood,' are your bag (or Baggins), well, then this is just your book."
Daggers and wizards, time travel, leprosy—for fans of fantasy, there's much to like in Donaldson's latest installment in the multivolume Thomas Covenant epic series of yore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST DARK by Stephen R. Donaldson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 15, 2013

"It goes without saying that a reader who enters the series without the benefit of the preceding volumes will be utterly lost. Definitively of a piece with what has come before; if you're a fan of Donaldson, this is indispensable. If not, of course, not."
The Thomas Covenant series comes to a lumbering halt after four decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAUGHTER OF REGALS by Stephen R. Donaldson
Released: April 12, 1984

"Hardworking, mannered, and fairly ordinary overall, but Donaldson fans will pounce—and even non-fans may be mildly, pleasantly surprised."
Eight tales, 1978-83, including six reprints—and a reasonably varied if sometimes poorly thought-out bunch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DARK AND HUNGRY GOD ARISES by Stephen R. Donaldson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 15, 1992

"Still: persecution and torment piled upon woe is precisely what Donaldson fans keep coming back for."
Third (The Real Story, 1990, Forbidden Knowledge, 1991) of the far-future series involving vicious corporations, aliens, pirates, power politics, police, and a wealth of characters you wouldn't want your children to bring home to dinner, from an author whose motto might well be "Life's a bitch, and then you die." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 14, 1986

"Still, Donaldson has a huge and fanatical following."
A new fantasy from the immensely popular author of the six-part Thomas Covenant chronicles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 15, 1990

"Repetitious and mediocre but readable, which is to say a definite improvement on gnarled melodrama (the Thomas Covenant series) and on vacuous reflections (the Mordant yarns)."
First of a new five-volume series, as Donaldson moves away from fantasy and into technological science fiction—where, in the medium-future, faster-than-light journeys ("crossing the Gap" by means of other dimensions) are a reality, though some travellers go mad, and space mining is controlled by Earth-based UMC, provenance of the rich and influential Hyland family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHITE GOLD WIELDER by Stephen R. Donaldson
Released: April 12, 1983

"Farcically implausible plotting, excruciating prose, lifelessly unevocative description, endless soporific interior monologues: the same recipe as before, in short, and strictly for Donaldson enthusiasts (of whom there are, inexplicably, hordes)."
Book three and last of The Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant (The Wounded Land, 1980; The One Tree, 1982). Read full book review >