Search Results: "Stephen S. Hall"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

"Shortness is not a prerequisite for enjoying Hall's work, but concerned parents of short boys will find it particularly reassuring."
Combining his own experiences, interviews with other men and the findings of various researchers, the author artfully reveals the ways in which male stature matters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1997

"As gripping as a spy thriller. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Immunotherapy seeks to get the immune system to stir up a molecular ``commotion in the blood'' to battle disease. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WISDOM by Stephen S. Hall
NON-FICTION
Released: March 23, 2010

"A steady stream of insights into the psychology and neurological mechanisms of wise decision-making and the researchers uncovering them."
A veteran science writer delivers a dense but illuminating combination of philosophical ideas and hard research. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 18, 2003

"A carefully documented examination of how society deals with life-and-death matters."
Immortality? Perhaps not, but life extension is already a reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"For the generalist striving mightily to keep up, this is a godsend. (Sixteen pages of color and 75 b&w illustrations—not seen.)"
In beautiful and sometimes moving prose, Hall (Invisible Frontiers, 1987) argues here that the common ground of space exploration, medical tomography, cosmology, greenhouse-effect modeling, and biotechnology is the map—and then offers a Grand Tour of the charting of these realms. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEPHEN SPENDER by John Sutherland
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"Pays fitting tribute to a man who was as admirable as he was gifted."
An excellent account of the British poet's life, particularly strong on his personality, literary friendships, and political activism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEPHEN FAIR by Tim Wynne-Jones
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: April 1, 1998

"An intense study in friendship and troubled family relations, in which the steadiest characters are the teenagers. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Recurrent nightmares and a strong feeling that his mother is hiding something haunt a teenager in this ethereal novel from Wynne-Jones (The Maestro, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEPHEN CRANE by Mark Sufrin
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 30, 1992

"Bibliography; b&w photos and index not seen. (Biography. 12+)"
An intelligent, beautifully written portrait of ``the first great pyro-technician of the novel, [who] probably wrote more trash than any other serious novelist of his time'' (Alfred Kazin): a strait-laced Methodist minister's rebellious son, who died in 1900, at 28, after a remarkably eventful life. Read full book review >