Search Results: "Steven Gould"


BOOK REVIEW

EXO by Steven Gould
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"There's simply no knowing where Cent and this series are headed next...but it'll sure be interesting to find out."
Gould literally raises the bar on teleportation in this sequel to Impulse (2013). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUMPER by Steven Gould
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"An exceptionally well-organized debut, with thoughtful ideas, a controlled plot, and characters—particularly the young protagonist—portrayed with insight and compassion."
Sprightly first novel combining revenge, growing up, lonely- superman and abuse-of-power motifs centered on a classic science- fiction theme: teleportation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELM by Steven Gould
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1998

"A well-handled, often persuasive drama, but rather too cozy and predictable."
On Agatsu, many years later, Leland de Laal, youngest son of Guide Dulan de Laal of Noramland, climbs the Needle rock to prove he's no weakling, finds the Glass Helm (the last imprinter), and puts it on. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IMPULSE by Steven Gould
Released: Jan. 15, 2013

"Mr. Gould, please write faster."
The third of a well-regarded series (that inspired a poorly regarded film) is essentially Teleporting: The Next Generation, as Davy and Millie Rice's daughter Cent discovers that she, too, can "jump." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLIND WAVES by Steven Gould
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"Solid sleuthing with an agreeable romance and plenty of hair-raising escapes: well up to Gould's previous high standards (Helm, 1998, etc.)."
Antarctic volcanoes have caused the polar ice to melt, raising sea levels by a hundred feet: as a consequence, the Immigration and Naturalization Service is now the second largest branch of the US armed forces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILDSIDE by Steven Gould
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1996

"A splendid adventure from the author of Jumper (1992), solidly plotted and with above-average characters, of particular appeal to the younger sections of the audience."
Eighteen-year-old Charlie Newell has inherited a farm from his uncle Max, and has plenty of ideas how to make money for college from it: In the barn, you see, is a tunnel with a gateway to an alternate world, the wildside, teeming with wildlife and bulging with mineral deposits, where humans never evolved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REFLEX by Steven Gould
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Dec. 1, 2004

"Compelling, chilling, and completely satisfying, with lots of knowing jokes for the fans and plenty of scope for more sequels."
Belated sequel to Gould's fine debut (Jumper, 1992) involving teleportation, spooks, and paranoia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Purple Canary by Joyce Gould
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 22, 2016

"Despite its flaws, this book may be useful for families affected by porphyria and may interest others frustrated by flawed education and medical systems in the United States."
A mother helps her daughter cope with a rare disease in this memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREEK VILLA by Judith Gould
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2003

"This latest from bestselling Gould (The Best Is Yet to Come, 2002, etc.) is—well, indescribable."
A mother's little ghostwriter digs up family secrets galore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEDUSA'S GIFT by Lois Gould
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"But what she's up to here—other than a freewheeling discussion of fame and a long drink of thick text—is anyone's guess."
Another sophisticated puzzler from Gould (Subject to Change, 1988, etc.) that uses ambiguous—though always rich—language and fragments of popular culture to toy with readers in a perversely pleasing way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECOND LOVE by Judith Gould
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 8, 1997

"Gould's fourth hardcover (Too Damn Rich, 1992, etc.) is one of her sillier offerings, with lots of explicit sex mixing pain with pleasure, and orgasms with visions of flower gardens, like clichÇs in ecstasy."
Gould continues in the Sidney Sheldon tradition, this time with echoes of Windmills of the Gods: a widowed heroine, a hit- woman, and a group of ominously foreign bad guys. Read full book review >