Search Results: "Steven Guarnaccia"


BOOK REVIEW

CINDERELLA by Steven Guarnaccia
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 4, 2014

"Chic and sophisticated, a delectable homage to fashion. (Picture book/fairy tale. 4-8)"
A crisp, modern take on the oft-told tale: deliciously subversive and visually captivating. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KNIT YOUR BIT by Deborah Hopkinson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 21, 2013

"A fine entry in commemoration of the upcoming centennial of World War I. (author's note, Web resources.) (Picture book. 4-8)"
Even boys can knit, when it's for their fathers fighting overseas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2010

"And why, in this time of eco-consciousness, does he disdain the recycled house of scraps? (Picture book. 3-6)"
Porkers in glass houses shouldn't meet wolves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARRY HUNGRY by Steven Salerno
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Children will delight in growling loudly along with Harry's tummy, turning story time into a rumbling, tumbling feast. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Harry is hungry! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MISSING MITTEN MYSTERY by Steven Kellogg
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The plot and pictures have undergone considerable change, but this is still suffused with Kellogg's characteristic warmth and charm and all the better for being easier to read to a group. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Kellogg (Give the Dog a Bone, see above, etc.) remakes his Mystery of the Missing Red Mitten (1974) into a larger, longer, and more colorful ramble through snow-covered landscapes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLACK STALLION AND THE LOST CITY by Steven Farley
ANIMALS
Released: June 28, 2011

"Readers are better off sticking to the originals. (Fiction. 9-12)"
The Black Stallion battles flesh-eating mares in this strange, off-putting addition to the late Walter Farley's series, written by his son. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Debut author Goldman, who clearly understands how teen boys think and speak, delivers an understated, genuine delight. (Fiction. 12-16)"
Take one nudity- and violence-filled claymation film, a suddenly gay best friend and plenty of dry wit. Read full book review >