Search Results: "Susan Marie Swanson"


BOOK REVIEW

LETTER TO THE LAKE by Susan Marie Swanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"If all love letters are made poignant by the sorrows of separation, this one rings true; the picture-book set, however, may find it too unsettling to appreciate. (Picture book. 5-9)"
From the team behind Getting Used to the Dark (1997), a picture book that contrasts the drudgery of a wintry here and now with sparkling, ever-green scenes of summer at the lake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRST THING MY MAMA TOLD ME by Susan Marie Swanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"Perfectly intertwined story and pictures are tender and heartwarming and will prompt parents and children to recall their own similar celebrations. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Picture books abound about children's identities and self-esteem, but this charmer takes a fresh approach and presents it in a child's first-person voice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUSE IN THE NIGHT by Susan Marie Swanson
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: May 5, 2008

"Krommes's breathtaking scratchboard illustrations, in black and white with accents of yellow and gold, embody and enhance the text's message that light and dark, like comfort and mystery, are not mutually exclusive, but integral parts of each other. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Inspired by a traditional poem from The Oxford Nursery Rhyme Book, Swanson's cumulative tale begins, "Here is the key to the house." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GETTING USED TO THE DARK by Susan Marie Swanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A promising collection, evocatively illustrated. (Poetry. 8-14)"
Swanson debuts with a brief but consistently high-quality gathering of unrhymed observations and meditations about sleep, dreams, night, nature, family, and other topics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO BE LIKE THE SUN by Susan Marie Swanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2008

"The large, wonderfully patterned illustrations are perfect for sharing, and the ideas lend themselves to discussion and curriculum applications for young children. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Addressing a sunflower seed, a small girl contemplates the transformation from seed to sunflower and back to seed again, from spring planting through winter snow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHARLEY by Donna Marie Seim
Released: Sept. 13, 2013

"A well-drawn coming-of-age tale about the loves and losses of a young boy."
Seim's debut middle-grade tale of an orphan's journey in the early 1900s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPER GEAR by Jennifer Swanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 7, 2016

"Plenty of good science sunk by tone and blunders. (Nonfiction. 9-12)"
Science teacher and writer Swanson tells the story behind nanotechnology's introduction and impact on sports. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MESMER'S DISCIPLE by Edward Swanson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 11, 2012

"History, action, the supernatural and intelligent discourse; this novel holds something for everyone."
Set in 1840s St. Louis and New York, this historical supernatural thriller pits Alvord Rawn, a vigilante-style New York cop with anger management issues, against Count Abendroth, a demonic mesmerist who has painter Charles Deas in his thrall. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE OF CORRECTIONS by Doug Swanson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Even though it's more straightforward that most of Jack's Hiaasenesque carnivals of crime, this one shows once more the folly of stocking your barrel with ordinary fish when you could fill it with fish who swim in circles, kill each other, and stick out their tongues."
When the two-bit police force of Luster, Texas, picks up Wesley Joy for speeding, pulls him in for the smidgen of heroin they find, and learns that the car he's driving was spotted leaving a drug-killing scene, Wesley, "lawyer to the stars of scum," is in a pickle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Madoc's Legacy by Edward Swanson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 30, 2014

"A rollicking, rip-roaring novel, big and wild as the American frontier."
Brawls and battles ensue when a trapping party encounters a weird tribe deep in the wilds of 19th-century Upper Michigan. Read full book review >