Search Results: "Susan Saint Sing"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2008

"Saint Sing's journeyman skills don't do full justice to the high drama of this tale of grit, teamwork and Olympic sportsmanship."
A U.S. Naval Academy crew stuns the rowing world by upsetting the British team at the 1920 Olympics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 16, 2010

"Intermittently revealing but inundated with hyperbole. Rowing enthusiasts are better served by David Halberstam's now classic The Amateurs (1985)."
Hagiographic account of the 2008 Harvard rowing season and a general paean to all things Harvard. Read full book review >

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FASHIONING A FRIENDSHIP
by Leila Roy

I sat back and considered my words. They had to be enough to get me in. After all, I alluded to the loss of my mom without mentioning any of the désagréables details, and I talked about the constant moving without getting into the foster homes and the times we’ve lived in the car. I think it is best not ...
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A STUDY IN MUST-READ AUTHORS
by Bobbi Dumas

So you all are Sherry Thomas fans, right?

I sincerely hope so! She’s seriously one of the smartest writers out there, and for whatever reason, her novels hit all my romance buttons. 

Last fall she released A Study in Scarlet Women, an intriguing new take on the Sherlock Holmes canon. (It got a great review and was named one ...


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BOOK REVIEW

PLUG AND THE PADDYWHACKS by Scholar & Saint
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 5, 2011

"Especially for an app aimed at young readers, it's a pleasant surprise that its subtext of loss and redemption is so resonant. So what if it's wrapped in an accessible, candy-colored package? (iPad storybook app. 4-12)"
A surprisingly deep story about freedom and rebellion wrapped in a cuddly adventure featuring space creatures, this episodic app so far is on the right track. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: Oct. 12, 2009

"Too cool for its own good. (Pop-up/fiction. 10 & up)"
"[E]yes are blind. You have to look with the heart," says the little prince, which makes this pop-up edition of the 1943 classic a bit of an odd duck. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEENY COMING, NEENY GOING by Karen English
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1996

"The shapes and forms of island life appear in minimalist blocks of primary color by Saint James that add pure sparkle to an already affecting, bittersweet text; it will encourage readers to recollect their own family members who have been, come, and gone. (Picture book. 5-9)"
English's first book employs a seamless blend of American and West African language and custom in a story about the pull of family, set in the 1950s on Daufuskie Island, off the coast of South Carolina. Read full book review >

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BACKLIST FAVES
by Leila Roy

As I’m sure I’ve mentioned here before, I love exploring backlists. Right now, for example, I’ve been working my way through all of Betty Ren Wright’s books—everyone knows The Dollhouse Murders, but she wrote DOZENS of other chapter books—and after reading Sue Macy’s Motor Girls for the Amelia Bloomer Project, I’ve been working my way through her older books as ...


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DIGGING DEEP
by Julie Danielson

Picture books are a greatly underestimated art form, too often dismissed, in the words of Maurice Sendak, as trifles for the kiddies. I’m about to teach a Summer graduate course, all about picture books, for the University of Tennessee, and I plan to kick it off with the usual request of my students: please try to go beyond merely “cute” ...


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BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 3, 2001

"A passionate, dreamlike memoir that draws you into its reverie."
A literary memoir from the wife of one of the most beloved figures in children's literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNDAY by Synthia Saint James
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Very young members of the picture-book set may want to connect more directly with the people pictured and grow weary of the facelessness, but older children will find the bold use of color and shapes appealing. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The design is the thing in this celebration of the activities of an African-American family, by the illustrator of Karen English's Neeny Coming, Neeny Going (1995). Read full book review >