Search Results: "Sylvia Brownrigg"


BOOK REVIEW

PAGES FOR YOU by Sylvia Brownrigg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2001

"A valentine that perfectly captures love's power to isolate the lovers from the rest of the world—and, in the end, from each other."
Brownrigg prunes back the overextended abstractions that weighed down The Metaphysical Touch (1999) to produce an affectingly slender love story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 10, 1989

A dull yet disturbing portrait of the late novelist/educator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEN WOMEN WHO SHOOK THE WORLD by Sylvia Brownrigg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Whimsy and wit float through these stories like fairy dust, and while the enchantment sometimes has a mechanical quality, mostly it can bring about wonder and delight."
Ten clever tales in a philosophical vein, often delicately surreal, from novelist Brownrigg (The Metaphysical Touch, 1999), who muses on the place of women in every capacity from makers of the world's wonders to givers of parties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORALITY TALE by Sylvia Brownrigg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 15, 2008

"Slow plotting and an exhaustingly cerebral narrator muffle the impact of the author's interesting experiments with tone."
Emma Bovary wannabe ponders an alternative to her mundane domestic lifestyle in this dreamlike but grating modern fable. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAGES FOR HER by Sylvia Brownrigg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2017

"Brownrigg considers motherhood, romance, identity, and the changes brought by time in this tender, insightful novel."
Two women, former lovers, reconnect with each other and themselves in Brownrigg's sequel (which can be read independently) to her 2001 novel, Pages for You. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DELIVERY ROOM by Sylvia Brownrigg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2008

"A gifted writer delivers a classic North London novel (sober; domestic; emotionally intelligent; middle-class) enhanced by insight and tenderness."
A period of growth, change and tragedy in the life of a London psychotherapist, her family and clients is ably tracked and empathetically dissected. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STANLIN & SYLVIA by Cynthia Hey
Released: Sept. 19, 2012

"Skewed to the younger end of the YA-fantasy spectrum, the author's adroit style maintains a buoyant tone even with apocalypse on the horizon."
Stanlin, a friendly space alien drawn to a kindly human girl, defies his planet's nonintervention policy and reveals himself to her when an incipient epidemic endangers all life on Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYLVIA & AKI by Winifred Conkling
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 12, 2011

"A well-documented, quietly powerful story. (afterword, further reading, bibliography & photographs) (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
Two third-grade girls in California suffer the dehumanizing effects of racial segregation after the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor in 1942 in this moving story based on true events in the lives of Sylvia Mendez and Aki Munemitsu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYLVIA JEAN, SCOUT SUPREME by Lisa Campbell Ernst
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Originally featured in Sylvia Jean, Drama Queen (2005), this sweet and spunky swine remains all heart. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Determined to earn her Good-Deed Badge, Pig Scout Sylvia Jean attempts to nurse her elderly neighbor, temporarily housebound with an ankle sprain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYLVIA AND BIRD by Catherine Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

"In all, though, it may impress the adult eye more than a child's. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In this quiet tale about friendship, Sylvia the dragon is lonely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: March 13, 2007

"A must for any young-adult reader of poetry or Plath. (Fiction/poetry. 12+)"
Perhaps at this literary juncture, where novelists supply bibliographies for their fiction and memoirists fictionalize to liberate certain "truths" and dramatize their memories, a "verse portrait" seems entirely in order. Read full book review >