Search Results: "Sylvia Jukes Morris"


BOOK REVIEW

PRICE OF FAME by Sylvia Jukes Morris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 17, 2014

"Luce once contracted to write her autobiography, which she planned to call The Dream of My Life. Morris perceptively reveals the nightmare in this evenhanded and intimate portrait."
The second volume in the life of a significant American figure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 1997

"Watch for Volume II—Clare as congresswoman and US ambassador. (45 b&w photos, not seen) (First serial to Vanity Fair; Book-of-the-Month Club selection)"
Morris dishes the fascinating dirt on—and logs the remarkable accomplishments of—this controversial author, social climber, magazine editor, athlete, foreign correspondent, and trophy wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 10, 1989

A dull yet disturbing portrait of the late novelist/educator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEPHEN MORRIS by Nevil Shute
Released: Sept. 11, 1961

"Shute, in these early writings, shows a gift for combining his major factual interest with a sense of character, but the plot aspects seem somewhat immature, though the subject matter sustains the interest."
While posthumously published, Stephen Morris actually brings together two early, short novels, never before published. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STANLIN & SYLVIA by Cynthia Hey
Released: Sept. 19, 2012

"Skewed to the younger end of the YA-fantasy spectrum, the author's adroit style maintains a buoyant tone even with apocalypse on the horizon."
Stanlin, a friendly space alien drawn to a kindly human girl, defies his planet's nonintervention policy and reveals himself to her when an incipient epidemic endangers all life on Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYLVIA & AKI by Winifred Conkling
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 12, 2011

"A well-documented, quietly powerful story. (afterword, further reading, bibliography & photographs) (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
Two third-grade girls in California suffer the dehumanizing effects of racial segregation after the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor in 1942 in this moving story based on true events in the lives of Sylvia Mendez and Aki Munemitsu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"A well-crafted labor of love, MacCarthy's biography chronicles the epic works of a man who inspired both Shaw and Yeats and continues to inspire today."
Morris's life of Pre-Raphaelite/Nordic poetry, medievalist arts and crafts, and socialist politics always makes for a readably overstuffed biography, and MacCarthy (Eric Gill, 1989, etc.) addresses each area knowledgeably and stays sympathetic to her hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYLVIA JEAN, SCOUT SUPREME by Lisa Campbell Ernst
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Originally featured in Sylvia Jean, Drama Queen (2005), this sweet and spunky swine remains all heart. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Determined to earn her Good-Deed Badge, Pig Scout Sylvia Jean attempts to nurse her elderly neighbor, temporarily housebound with an ankle sprain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2007

A true story, aside from snatches of invented dialogue, this account centers on a young blind man's determination to become less dependent on the whims and charity of others. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORRIS THE ARTIST by Lore Segal
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 5, 2003

"A fascinating debut. (Picture book. 4-7)"
Morris is an artist; he doesn't want to attend Benjamin's birthday party, but his mother insists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYLVIA AND BIRD by Catherine Rayner
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

"In all, though, it may impress the adult eye more than a child's. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In this quiet tale about friendship, Sylvia the dragon is lonely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POETRY
Released: March 13, 2007

"A must for any young-adult reader of poetry or Plath. (Fiction/poetry. 12+)"
Perhaps at this literary juncture, where novelists supply bibliographies for their fiction and memoirists fictionalize to liberate certain "truths" and dramatize their memories, a "verse portrait" seems entirely in order. Read full book review >