Search Results: "T.J. Marsh"


BOOK REVIEW

MARSH CAT by Peter Parnall
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 30, 1991

"Several handsome drawings are included. (Fiction. 9-14)"
An illustrator with three Caldecott Honor books to his credit tries his hand at a novel with his favorite theme: the interrelationships of creatures living near his Maine farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECKMIRE MARSH by Sara Hylton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 1995

"Fast-moving, but with a hollow ring throughout."
British novelist Hylton's 14th output (Shadow of the Nile, 1994, etc.) is light on history and heavy on histrionics as its insipid heroine weathers the horrors of WW II with a decided lack of common sense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAY OUT IN THE DESERT by T.J.  Marsh
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1998

"A glossary at the end of the book provides a more detailed account of the creatures. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Marsh and Ward's quick tour of the Sonoran Desert introduces readers to both local fauna (such as the horned toad, javelinas, tarantulas, Gila monsters, roadrunners, and scorpions) and flora (palo verde, ocotillo, saguaro, and prickly pear). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIL MARSH by A.C.E. Bauer
Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"What's ultimately lacking, though, is a compelling link between myth and contemporary tale. (French glossary, author's note) (Fiction. 12 & up)"
Smart, handsome, athletic Gil Marsh, 17, hero of this contemporary take on the Gilgamesh epic (and first literary bromance) thinks he has no competition. Then hirsute Enko Labette shows up at Uruk High. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARSH MADNESS by Caroline Cousins
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 30, 2005

"Cousins, a real-life writing trio of cousins (Fiddle Dee Death, 2003), knows her Dixie, from Coca-Cola for breakfast to sweet tea for lunch. The slender plot is enlivened by sly humor and Southern hospitality with a bite."
Mayhem with a Southern accent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: March 15, 2000

"A counting book with an ecology message with a modicum of appeal. (glossary, musical score) (Nonfiction. 3-6)"
The authors give new lyrics to the familiar rhyming folksong `Over in the Meadow,` here counting ocean mothers and their offspring one to ten from manatee to octopus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2009

"A welcome installment in Bass's ongoing place-centered autobiography."
A fan's notes on wilderness, log-cabin life, grizzly bears and other aspects of the American outback. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Marsh Township Sanitary District by John Kevin Scariano
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 19, 2013

"A smart, ribald and often provocative memoir."
A man recalls his teenage years working a horrible job in the 1970s in this debut memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SALT MARSH DIARY by Mark Seth Lender
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2011

"A mixed bag—a soft rejoinder of sorts to Henry Beston's coastal classic The Outermost House (1925), slightly old-fashioned and sometimes cloying, but still a pleasure for the birdwatching completist."
An unabashedly anthropomorphic celebration of life in the salt marsh. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARSH KING'S DAUGHTER by Karen Dionne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 13, 2017

"Dionne tries to strike a balance between psychological thriller and coming-of-age tale, but the end result feels more like an unsettling walk down Memory Lane."
The daughter of an escaped convict tracks her father through the wilderness while reflecting upon her childhood as his prisoner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 14, 2007

"Interesting reading, but Elizabeth Marsh remains in many ways an enigma."
A life whose tumultuous historical backdrop included the Seven Years War, the slave trade and globalization becomes a lens through which to view a world in motion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 31, 1993

Perhaps it's only to be expected that the love story of John Marsh and Margaret Mitchell should be—at least as described here- -as romantic as the colossus it produced. Read full book review >