Search Results: "Tana Hoban"


BOOK REVIEW

CONSTRUCTION ZONE by Tana Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1997

"While not as tight as Hoban's other concept books, this will be a winner with kids who have devoured Byron Barton's Machines at Work, Anne Rockwell's Big Wheels, and B.G. Hennessy's Road Builders and who now want real pictures. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-7)"
From Hoban (Just Look, 1996, etc.), a series of full-page color photographs of construction machinery at work, from a rubber-tired backhoe to a crane with clamshell bucket. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLORS EVERYWHERE by Tana Hoban
Released: May 1, 1995

"A convincing case. (Picture book. 2+)"
Hoban (Spirals, Curves, Fanshapes and Lines, 1992, etc.) wordlessly introduces children to the rich color palettes around them in an ingenious way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXACTLY THE OPPOSITE by Tana Hoban
Released: Sept. 24, 1991

"Beautiful, elegantly composed, nourishing to eye and mind."
Again selecting an intriguing variety of subjects from city and country—and presenting both animate and inanimate objects with a delightful use of color—this fine photographer pairs uncaptioned images that explore the concept of opposites. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SO MANY CIRCLES, SO MANY SQUARES by Tana Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Perhaps only city children will notice; aside from that, this is a tidy book, and one that puts across Hoban's undeviating message to look, and see. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Hoban's wordless concept book of circles and squares is graced with thrilling full-color photographs but marred by a small, rude gesture in one picture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST LOOK by Tana Hoban
by Tana Hoban, illustrated by Tana Hoban
Released: April 1, 1996

"1988; Take Another Look, 1981) without enlarging on or varying it. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3+)"
Peep through a die-cut hole. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPIRALS, CURVES, FANSHAPES AND LINES by Tana Hoban
Released: Sept. 16, 1992

Another fascinating collection of Hoban's provocative color photos. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL ABOUT WHERE by Tana Hoban
Released: April 26, 1991

"(Nonfiction/Picture book. 3+)"
An innovative pictorial approach to prepositions: 15 of them are listed in the outside margins of the first and last pages here, so that they can be seen when the cropped, textless inner pages are turned, each displaying a single color photo that—in typical Hoban style—is intriguing for both subject and design and suggests several of the words: "above," "out," "through," etc. Much to consider, to learn, to discuss, and to enjoy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I READ SIGNS; I READ SYMBOLS by Tana Hoban
Released: Oct. 17, 1983

"Both are simple, instructive, and dazzling."
Spanking, bold, head-on images—that put other sign-displays in the shade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE IS IT? by Tana Hoban
Released: Feb. 1, 1974

"In the running for this season's bunny blue ribbon."
A cottony, eastery bunny pantomimes "I wonder. . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOK AGAIN! by Tana Hoban
Released: March 1, 1971

"No words come between the photographs and the child; the creator of Shapes and Things (1970) uses her camera eye to reveal and relate as nothing else can."
The first look — through a square hole centered in a white page — tempts, teases, bestirs: what to make of those nodes and filaments, those cloudy stars? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHADOWS AND REFLECTIONS by Tana Hoban
Released: March 19, 1990

"Although the subjects will appeal to young children, there's nothing here to limit its appeal to them."
Another assembly of mind-expanding images from a gifted photographer who now has at least 24 fine concept books for children to her credit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAKE ANOTHER LOOK by Tana Hoban
Released: Feb. 1, 1981

"There's still some pleasure in the encounter, of course, but less variety, imagination, or resonance."
Perhaps the magic of Tana Hoban's Look Again!, a 1971 event, was not to be recaptured: that first glimpse, through a die-cut hole, of a fuzzy, starry, mysterious something; overleaf, the perfect head of a dandelion gone to seed; on the reverse, an intent black child, lips pursed, blowing. Read full book review >