Search Results: "Tana Hoban"


BOOK REVIEW

EXACTLY THE OPPOSITE by Tana Hoban
Released: Sept. 24, 1991

"Beautiful, elegantly composed, nourishing to eye and mind."
Again selecting an intriguing variety of subjects from city and country—and presenting both animate and inanimate objects with a delightful use of color—this fine photographer pairs uncaptioned images that explore the concept of opposites. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 18, 1972

"A turtle's head is photographed in and out of its shell, and a vegetable basket is at first empty, then full of mushrooms; together and apart are neatly demonstrated by the wooden pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, whole and broken by two luminously perfect, then palpably viscous eggs — and so on with Hoban's usual stunning effects."
More of Tana Hoban's Shapes and Things, paired this time to illustrate the concept of opposites. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE LITTLE KITTEN by Tana Hoban
Released: Aug. 13, 1979

One Little Kitten goes Over, Under & Through, as it were. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I READ SIGNS; I READ SYMBOLS by Tana Hoban
Released: Oct. 17, 1983

"Both are simple, instructive, and dazzling."
Spanking, bold, head-on images—that put other sign-displays in the shade. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE IS IT? by Tana Hoban
Released: Feb. 1, 1974

"In the running for this season's bunny blue ribbon."
A cottony, eastery bunny pantomimes "I wonder. . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAPES AND THINGS by Tana Hoban
Released: Aug. 10, 1970

"The images are both material and dematerialized, and the familiar yields a startling beauty."
Things to identify, shapes to perceive: like John Reiss' Colors, this is an apparently simple, actually subtle aesthetic exercise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIG, DRILL, DUMP, FILL by Tana Hoban
Released: Oct. 13, 1975

"George Ancona's Monsters on Wheels (1974) packed a lot more horsepower."
In spite of a title that reminds us of Push, Pull, Empty, Full there's no particular conceptual organization to these photos of heavy machinery at work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IS IT LARGER?  IS IT SMALLER? by Tana Hoban
Released: April 15, 1985

Relative size is the concept unifying Hoban's latest collection of eye-filling photos. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

1, 2, 3 BOARD BOOK; WHAT IS IT? by Tana Hoban
Released: March 1, 1985

"But for display, or for the diversion of visiting tots, it's worth considering—while parents, caretakers, and kin will seize upon the books—especially 1, 2, 3: a looking-and-learning knockout with its red numerals, number-words, and dots-to-count."
Once there was a squarish book, of simple color photographs of familiar nursery objects, that endured for decades because it was so unequivocally and unsurpassingly a first book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONSTRUCTION ZONE by Tana Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1997

"While not as tight as Hoban's other concept books, this will be a winner with kids who have devoured Byron Barton's Machines at Work, Anne Rockwell's Big Wheels, and B.G. Hennessy's Road Builders and who now want real pictures. (Picture book/nonfiction. 3-7)"
From Hoban (Just Look, 1996, etc.), a series of full-page color photographs of construction machinery at work, from a rubber-tired backhoe to a crane with clamshell bucket. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLORS EVERYWHERE by Tana Hoban
Released: May 1, 1995

"A convincing case. (Picture book. 2+)"
Hoban (Spirals, Curves, Fanshapes and Lines, 1992, etc.) wordlessly introduces children to the rich color palettes around them in an ingenious way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SO MANY CIRCLES, SO MANY SQUARES by Tana Hoban
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 1998

"Perhaps only city children will notice; aside from that, this is a tidy book, and one that puts across Hoban's undeviating message to look, and see. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Hoban's wordless concept book of circles and squares is graced with thrilling full-color photographs but marred by a small, rude gesture in one picture. Read full book review >