Search Results: "Tania Carver"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CREEPER by Tania Carver
Released: Sept. 15, 2012

"Carver doesn't stint on the fun-house shocks and shivers, and gourmands of violence, physical and psychological, will have a field day. But there's so much straining to get in your face, so many chapters from the Creeper's point of view, and such a pat motive for all the mayhem, that the nasty thrills never upstage the dysfunctional relationships within the Colchester constabulary."
A sadistic killer targets the few young women of Colchester to have survived Carver's blistering debut (The Surrogate, 2011). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLACK ROAD by Tania Carver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 15, 2014

"Overly long and lacking in polish."
Carver (the pen name of a British husband-and-wife team) adds another grisly layer to her Marina Esposito series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SURROGATE by Tania Carver
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 24, 2011

"A good premise that's long on promise, but the choppy writing, dominated by melodramatic one-liners, and stilted repetition of phrases (no one simply drinks anything, instead they take mouthfuls of their drinks) prove more distracting than thrilling."
Carver's debut novel, a thriller with a decidedly British flair, isn't for the squeamish or easily frightened. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARRING SHAPES! by Tania Howells
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Not for beginners, but older children may use this as a springboard for their own shape hunts. (Math picture book. 4-7) "
Howells give familiar shapes both personalities and back stories in her authorial debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOCKS! by Tania Sohn
by Tania Sohn, illustrated by Tania Sohn
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2014

"A concept book that falls short. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A little girl just loves her many-colored socks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILL YOU PLEASE BE QUIET, PLEASE? by Raymond Carver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1976

"A deftly executed first collection by a young West Coast writer and a genuine tribute to that other citizen—the semi-literate wash-out, the hod-carrier, the Levittown homeowner—who lives a million light-years away from the American Dream."
Raymond Carver's people have no faces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CATHEDRAL by Raymond Carver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1983

"Still, when he plays it straight, as in 'Cathedral,' this storyteller works us magically into that supreme fictional zone of intimacy and surprise—making his third collection, despite its frequent wobbles, a distinguished, powerful book from a very special writer."
With his third collection of stories, Carver has securely hit his stride; his stories seem like no one else's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT LOVE by Raymond Carver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 20, 1981

"Still, as artifacts of American culture right this minute, they are mightily impressive and, at their best, invested with a fiercely humane pathos."
Carver's spare voice remains distinctive in this new collection of stories (Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?, 1977, was his first). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHERE I'M CALLING FROM by Raymond Carver
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 31, 1988

Carver's shrewd new publisher here repackages 30 stories—a few with new titles—from his four collections, and includes seven uncollected pieces, one of which has never seen print. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ONE SAFE PLACE by Tania Unsworth
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 29, 2014

"A standout in the genre's crowded landscape. (Dystopian thriller. 10-16)"
A group of orphans uncovers a sinister plot in this chilling and engrossing tale filled with detailed, sharply drawn characters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ATLAS OF UNKNOWNS by Tania James
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 24, 2009

"A touching debut novel with a range of tones, from the sweet to the sordid."
A student's odyssey from India to the United States and eventually back to India, a journey that raises personal and cultural questions about family, immigration and doing the right thing. Read full book review >