Search Results: "Taylor Branch"


BOOK REVIEW

LABYRINTH by Taylor Branch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 9, 1982

"Exhaustively researched, well-written, and spooky."
A sober, unsensational "inside" account of the Orlando Letelier case, co-authored by the federal prosecutor who handled it from the day when the Chilean ex-diplomat and an assistant were killed by a car bomb in the middle of Washington, D.C. The title is apt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1988

"In brief, then, a vivid, panoramic text that documents in telling detail the roots of an epic, many-splendored cause."
An affecting, wide-ranging evocation of a turbulent decade when the civil-rights movement launched its fiercely determined, largely nonviolent battle for America's social conscience and soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 2013

"Though no substitute for the larger epic, the book is a reliable gloss on a troubling era."
The quick-read version of the author's three-volume America in the King Years, focusing more on dramatic high points than narrative context. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 2, 1998

"With a third volume to come, this history is taking pride of place among the dozens of fine chronicles of this time of tumult and moral witness in American history."
In this stirring follow-up to his Pulitzer Prizewinning Parting the Waters (1988), Branch recalls the terror, dissension, and courage of the civil-rights movement at its zenith: the mid- 1960s agitation leading to landmark integration and voting-rights legislation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2009

"A one-of-a-kind—though not particularly revealing—perspective on the Clinton presidency."
A history of the Bill Clinton years based on taped interviews with the president while he was in office. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMPIRE BLUES by Taylor Branch
Released: April 13, 1981

"But Branch is spirited, imaginative, and brightly wicked with words—and we can only hope that he hasn't thrown all his best material into this under-edited, over-ambitious, fatally unfocused debut."
First-novelist Branch (a Washington columnist/editor) is hip as can be, loaded with talent (chiefly satiric), and bursting with ideas for a half-dozen novels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"A hallmark, essential to an understanding of the civil-rights movement, Dr. King and 20th-century America."
Branch closes his monumental trilogy on Martin Luther King Jr. with gravity and grace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUNETEENTH by Muriel Miller Branch
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

"Sketchy information on how to organize a celebration appears; the book makes use of excellent black-and- white reproductions and amateurish, badly cropped contemporary photographs. (bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
A book with an inviting format just adequately explains the African-American celebration and its origins in Texas of the 1900s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOY ON ICE by John Branch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"A sad, tragic story that underscores the high human cost of violent entertainment."
Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Branch debuts with a biography of hockey player Derek Boogaard (1982-2011), a fierce fighter on the ice who died of an overdose of alcohol and prescription painkillers at the age of 28. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

NO ONE REMEMBERS YOUR NAME, WHEN YOU’RE STRANGE
by Jennie K.

BOOK REPORT for Strange the Dreamer (Strange the Dreamer #1) (ISBN13: 978-0-316-34168-4) by Laini Taylor

Cover Story: Sparklemoth Split
BFF Charm: Yay x2
Swoonworthy Scale: 7
Talky Talk: Dreams of Libraries and Godspawn
Bonus Factors: Librarians, Tasty Business
Relationship Status: Missing My Other Half

Cover Story: Sparklemoth Split

Although I’m not crazy about the font, this is such a pretty ...


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BLOG POST

CHARLES TAYLOR

Reliant as they were on call girls, cars, corpses, and Kris Kristofferson, the B-movies of the 1970s may not qualify as high art, according to cultural critic Charles Taylor, but at least they took American audiences seriously.

“For me, the staying power of these movies has to do with the way they stand in opposition to the current juvenile state ...


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