Search Results: "Ted Hughes"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Allowing for characteristic poetic license, the reader finishes Hughes's best pieces with a renewed understanding of poetryand a rekindled passion for it."
With as much myth-making as metrical analysis, poet Hughes's diverse pieceswhether on Shakespeare, Sylvia Plath, war poetry, or Norse mythscohere into a provocative, bewitched view of poetry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES OF THE EARLY WORLD by Ted Hughes
Released: March 15, 1991

"Resonant, fascinating; to read aloud, again and again."
In the tradition of Kipling's Just So Stories - elegantly playful pourquoi tales - Britain's poet laureate offers ten witty stories about the Creation, with God as an industrious, imaginative inventor who sometimes leaves an animal unfinished when he's tired at the end of a day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIRTHDAY LETTERS by Ted Hughes
Released: Feb. 27, 1998

"But as long as Ariel is read - which will be a long time - this less passionate, less edgy volume will stand by its side."
Britain's Poet Laureate, the author of many volumes of verse, translation, and criticism, here stuns the literary world by writing at long last about his marriage to poet and feminist martyr Sylvia Plath. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIFFICULTIES OF A BRIDEGROOM by Ted Hughes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1996

"Good news for fans of Hughes (and Plath) only; less resonant for others."
A first collection of fairy tales and fables from Britain's Poet Laureate (Winter Pollen, 1995, etc.), who seems somewhat less than steady on his feet when it comes to prose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAT AND THE CUCKOO by Ted Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2003

"The few Briticisms may be as foreign to some American readers as the setting—yet neither detracts, as each poem encourages readers to observe something in a new way. (Poetry. 7-11)"
Quirky, clever, mysterious, and lyrical poems about 28 wild and domestic farm animals comprise this collection, originally published (by Sunstone Press, with different illustrations) in England in 1997. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLLECTED POEMS FOR CHILDREN by Ted Hughes
POETRY
Released: April 2, 2007

"A necessary antidote for today's youngster who might be missing out on an affirmation of youth and innocence as well as an experience of complex, playful lyrics composed by a master of word music. (Poetry. 8+)"
Amazing things happen on the page when giants write and illustrate for little people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE IRON WOMAN by Ted Hughes
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

A gigantic Iron Woman rises out of a swamp in order to destroy a factory that is poisoning rivers and killing fish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY BROTHER BERT by Ted Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 2009

"This merry read is both good fun and a dynamic introduction to a literary lion. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Hughes's ebullient poem about a boy's clandestine collection of pets receives a picture-book makeover. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAISY SAVES THE DAY by Shirley  Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 9, 2015

"An impressive and delightful combination of visual and verbal storytelling evokes empathy and identification with the young heroine. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A girl's time "in service" in a London house offers young readers a glimpse of life below-stairs in 1911. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOBBO GOES TO SCHOOL by Shirley Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 12, 2013

"Another satisfying domestic drama from veteran author Hughes, this will please old fans and make new ones. (Picture book. 3 to 6)"
The plot is a familiar one: A young child and her favorite stuffed friend are separated and then joyously reunited. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIDING by Shirley Hughes
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1994

"Charming and enriching. (Picture book. 2-6)"
As she did in Bouncing and Giving (both 1993), Hughes explores and extends what initially looks like a simple concept: At first, a child plays peekaboo with a toddler who's gazing raptly at the cushion from behind which she declares ``You can't see me''; then they play hide-and-seek, in which the place of concealment is a secret. Read full book review >