Search Results: "Ted Naifeh"


BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOD NEIGHBORS by Holly Black
FANTASY
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Providing enough introductory exposition, this should hook its reader, but still leave enough mystery to leave readers clamoring for the next installment. (Graphic fantasy. 12 & up)"
From two accomplished veterans comes a dark urban fantasy about a girl seeking the truth about her past—and her future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AT GLEASON’S GYM by Ted Lewin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"Well-known for his portrayal of faraway places, Lewin returns to the world he described in I Was a Teen-aged Professional Wrestler (1993) to make this distinctive introduction for even younger readers. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Gleason's Gym in Brooklyn, N.Y., is a training place for boxers and wrestlers from all over the world including nine-year-old Sugar Boy Younan, who is preparing for the National Silver Gloves championship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

O CANADA by Ted Harrison
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Canada's national anthem is included. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 6-10)"
A brief, affectionate statement about Canada as a whole prefaces a similar page on each of its provinces, mentioning natural resources, characterizing the population, and pointing out distinctive qualities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 1993

"Fine writing, Kodachrome vision, and superintense drama: a real plum for true-crime fans. (Eight pages of b&w photographs- -not seen)"
Sweeping murder-and-megabucks true-life gothic, Texas-style. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A YELLOW WATERMELON by Ted Dunagan
ADVENTURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2007

"A memorable, generous-hearted tale. (Historical fiction. 10-14)"
Twelve-year-old Ted Dillon is an innocent white boy in rural Alabama in 1948, but his new friendships with a black boy named Poudlum Robinson and an escaped black convict named Jake introduce him to a world where greed and racism intersect. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIBYA by Ted Gottfried
HISTORY
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Recommended Reading'' (adult); index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Gottfried brings Libya's colorful political history to life in a well-written, in-depth summary that's remarkable for its balance in treating an avowed enemy of the US. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A TIME WITHOUT SHADOWS by Ted Allbeury
Released: Jan. 15, 1990

The latest thriller from the prolific and capable Allbeury (Deep Purple, p. 116) begins with a startling question from a backbencher in Parliament about wartime events long buried and—the government hopes—forgotten. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARK OF THE LIBERTIES by Ted Widmer
NON-FICTION
Released: July 4, 2008

"An unusual and engaging tour of the horizon of American diplomacy that should appeal to both scholarly and general audiences."
Diplomatic history of the United States, emphasizing its spiritual underpinnings as much as wars and treaties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2008

"A punishing read, filled with righteous anger and fuzzy on details."
Veteran true-crime/entertainment scribe Schwarz (Hollywood Confidential: How the Studios Beat the Mob at Their Own Game, 2007, etc.) charts the lurid life and times of a stripper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BELLS OF AUTUMN by Ted Willis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 1991

"Rosie as M.P. is a bit much, but followers of her sentimental, soapy adventures will want to be in on the last spin."
Of necessity (unless Willis provides a Holmesian resurrection), this will be the last novel about the career of that tough, loudmouthed Rosie Carr, whose rise form London waif-hood has been traced in Spring at the Winged Horse (1982) and The Green Leaves of Summer (1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHOW ME A HERO by Ted Allbeury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"This is gentle reading for pensioned cold war soldiers."
Prolific thriller specialist Allbeury (A Time Without Shadows, 1991, etc.) backtracks in a rather nostalgic bit of historic fiction about a loyal communist who spent his life in the US spying for a glorious USSR that never existed. ``Based on truth'' and covering a cold war that has ended, leaving no doubt about the outcome, this is more memoir than thriller. Read full book review >