Search Results: "Ten Sato"


BOOK REVIEW

HANSEL AND GRETEL by Ten Sato
illustrated by Ten Sato, developed by DICO, by The Brothers Grimm
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 27, 2011

"Fans of the grimmest Grimm stories may find this app's artwork to be worth a peek, but the story itself doesn't provide much that is new or different. (iPad storybook app. 4-8)"
Lush illustrations are let down by rote, bland storytelling in this oddly paced, tone-deaf version of the Brothers Grimm tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO HAS THE BIGGEST BOTTOM? by Marijke ten Cate
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"A quick bit of fun for fans of Bob Staake's Look! A Book! (2011) and like seek-and-find scrambles. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In this jolly import, spotting the largest bottom, the barest belly, the widest mouth and like superlatives in a loose gathering of children, animals and animate toys preparing to put on a circus will draw young viewers into all sorts of visual funny business. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SICK ROSE by Haruo Sato
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Intense and lyrical meditations on life, art, and the individual enhanced by a disarming wryness, honesty, and luminous prose."
The first English translation of three novellas from an author of Japan's Taisho period (1912-26)—a period in which writers began to define, with acknowledgments to Western literature, ``a contemporary Japanese sense of self.'' All three stories, which together form a loose continuum, are as much luminous evocations of the landscape of the soul as of the countryside and city. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2009

"An eloquent personal work that's also an important portrait of a shameful period in American history."
Touching account of a Japanese-American woman's experiences, including her family's struggle through internment during World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 1991

"Scientific names of plants in the index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Eye-catching, full-color flower photos enhance this adaptation of Colors of Flowers and Insects (published in Japan in 1988). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TREEHOUSES OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST by Paul Victor
IPAD BOOK APPS
Released: April 29, 2014

"A splendid gateway to the world of treehouse building that just might inspire users to take a crack at creating a little wonderment of their own. (Requires iOS 6.1 and above.)"
The real-life Rivendell awaits in an app that captures the arboreal awesomeness that exists, not in Middle Earth, but within the borders of the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The many fragmented individual stories tend to blur together, but the message comes through loud and clear."
The lives of nine families just barely scraping by in four New York City neighborhoods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VERY BEST DOOR OF ALL by Clara Linders
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2001

"A fairly absurd little treat made memorable by Cate's stunning artwork, with its sophisticated color and design. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A cockamamie story about a cockamamie birthday present—suitable as an April Fool's joke—from Netherlanders Linders and Cate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KISSES by Nanda Roep
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 30, 2002

"Ponder Goembel (1995), or, for that matter, Else Minarik's Kiss For Little Bear, illustrated by Maurice Sendak (1968), this import could easily spark an intimate, giggle-inducing, parent-child bonding ritual. (Picture book. 3-5)"
When, snuggled up in bed, little Lisa raccoon asks Daddy for a kiss, she gets an entire catalogue to choose from: "Do you want . . . a witch's kiss? . . . a butterfly kiss? . . . a grandma kiss? . . . an Eskimo kiss?" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A STRANGE DAY by Iris van der Heide
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 2007

"A breezy, kid-savvy delight. (Picture book. 3-8)"
One windy day—the one on which Jack will learn if he's won the drawing contest—the postman has a mishap. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The many fragmented individual stories tend to blur together, but the message comes through loud and clear."
The lives of nine families just barely scraping by in four New York City neighborhoods. Read full book review >