Search Results: "Terence Blacker"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ANGEL FACTORY by Terence Blacker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"What food there is here for discussion—free will, adoption, good and evil—is like most junk food: superficially appealing and not terribly satisfying. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Driven by plot and theme, this British import features a 12-year-old boy who discovers that angels right here on Earth are asking for his help in saving humanity from itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KILL YOUR DARLINGS by Terence Blacker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"A long in-joke, but a good one."
Adult and children's author Blacker (Homebird, 1993, etc.) reveals far more than anyone should know about a writer's inner and outer lives—in a very amusing bit of madness that will prove hideously embarrassing to anyone who's ever dreamed of literary success. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MS. WIZ by Terence Blacker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Instead of plot development, the focus relies too heavily on cheap jokes for little laughs. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Clad in tight jeans and sporting black nail polish, spell-casting Ms. Wiz, with an omniscient cat and curious rat in tow, transforms the Class Three children from little terrors to terrific pupils. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TWYNING by Terence Blacker
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Thoroughly unpleasant and turgid to boot. (rat glossary) (Fantasy. 12-14)"
Rats and humans declare war on one another in this gory study in hidden fears and shifting loyalties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOY2GIRL by Terence Blacker
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 9, 2005

"Quite different from Blacker's other import, Angel Factory (2002), this farce with a slightly too-convenient ending will please readers looking for light laugh. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Matthew, a British 13-year-old, is all set for a quiet summer of knocking about with his friends when his mother is called away to America to attend the funeral of her wild sister, Galaxy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARENT SWAP by Terence Blacker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 10, 2006

"A satisfying, entertaining spoof on both a common teenage desire and reality show culture. (Fiction. 10-14)"
With a mother who's moved out to pursue a career and a sit-in-front-of-the-TV-and-drink-beer-all-day father who used to be a hit musician in the '70s but now can't even leave the apartment, who wouldn't want to change parents? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOMEBIRD by Terence Blacker
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 30, 1993

"The danger and cast of runaways in Nelson's The Beggar's Ride (1992) are far more vividly drawn. (Fiction. 11- 13)"
A wry, loosely knit story of a British teenager who experiments with running away. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1989

While some of the dialogue in these nine minimalist tales about Irish musicians and neurotic couples is amusing, little of it leads anywhere—which is the fate of the lives Winch chronicles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COME BACK DEAD by Terence Faherty
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 5, 1997

"But the mystery pays off at the end with enough sockdolagizing surprises for a month at the bijou."
It's 1955, and Orson Welles is riding again—at least a taller, thinner Welles in a wheelchair, a prematurely washed-up director named Carson Drury who, 15 years after his glorious Hollywood debut, First Citizen, is clutching at the chance to jump-start his stalled career by reshooting the ending of the botched second film, The Imperial Albertsons, snatched from his hands by RKO back in 1942. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CURIOUS? by Terence Simmons
Released: April 1, 2012

"A short and simple but, alas, way too rhetorical look at our collective curiosity."
One man's attempt to provide a short answer to a tall question. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KING OF RUMAH NADAI by Terence Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 1994

"A lightweight effort, often provocative and entertaining enough, that ultimately suffers from inconsistencies and holes in characterization."
Clarke's third novel (after My Father in the Night, 1991) recounts the experience of Dan Collins, an adventure-seeking State Department development officer stationed in Borneo in the 1960s. Read full book review >