Search Results: "Terence Rothwell"


BOOK REVIEW

AFTER THE FALL by Terence Rothwell
Released: July 22, 2012

"A solid core of character and concept that needs tighter editing to bring it up to speed."
Rothwell's post-apocalyptic debut novel takes place after global warming ravages Earth and a new world order cobbles the pieces of the United States into a hegemonic nightmare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1989

While some of the dialogue in these nine minimalist tales about Irish musicians and neurotic couples is amusing, little of it leads anywhere—which is the fate of the lives Winch chronicles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CURIOUS? by Terence Simmons
Released: April 1, 2012

"A short and simple but, alas, way too rhetorical look at our collective curiosity."
One man's attempt to provide a short answer to a tall question. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COME BACK DEAD by Terence Faherty
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 5, 1997

"But the mystery pays off at the end with enough sockdolagizing surprises for a month at the bijou."
It's 1955, and Orson Welles is riding again—at least a taller, thinner Welles in a wheelchair, a prematurely washed-up director named Carson Drury who, 15 years after his glorious Hollywood debut, First Citizen, is clutching at the chance to jump-start his stalled career by reshooting the ending of the botched second film, The Imperial Albertsons, snatched from his hands by RKO back in 1942. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ANGEL FACTORY by Terence Blacker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"What food there is here for discussion—free will, adoption, good and evil—is like most junk food: superficially appealing and not terribly satisfying. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Driven by plot and theme, this British import features a 12-year-old boy who discovers that angels right here on Earth are asking for his help in saving humanity from itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KILL YOUR DARLINGS by Terence Blacker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2001

"A long in-joke, but a good one."
Adult and children's author Blacker (Homebird, 1993, etc.) reveals far more than anyone should know about a writer's inner and outer lives—in a very amusing bit of madness that will prove hideously embarrassing to anyone who's ever dreamed of literary success. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"A well-written, provocative re-imagining of the world as it was, is and will be."
A bold, controversial book of physics theory by biomedical engineer and businessman Witt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW YORK by Terence Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2017

"A sweet and well-paced series of urban vignettes."
A collection of short stories explores New York City across time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICAN NEOLITHIC by Terence Hawkins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 2014

"A towering work of speculative fiction that will have readers rethinking what it means to be human."
This powerful cautionary tale mixes political satire and legal thrills in a near-future America where the existence of a Neanderthal threatens a government that has devolved into a "trailer park theocracy." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KING OF RUMAH NADAI by Terence Clarke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 6, 1994

"A lightweight effort, often provocative and entertaining enough, that ultimately suffers from inconsistencies and holes in characterization."
Clarke's third novel (after My Father in the Night, 1991) recounts the experience of Dan Collins, an adventure-seeking State Department development officer stationed in Borneo in the 1960s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ORDAINED by Terence Faherty
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 10, 1997

"Short, stark, and sparsely peopled with angularly fascinating figures: Faherty's portrait of Rapture has all the fine black-and-white detail you'd expect from a mid-century daguerreotype."
Rapture, Indiana, got its name from the millennialist prophets who planned to use it as their point of departure for the world's end. Read full book review >