Search Results: "Teresa E. Woods"


BOOK REVIEW

THE FIXER by Teresa E. Woods
Released: May 29, 2012

"Solid characters, unpredictable twists and excellent plotting; a must-read for those who enjoy crime fiction."
The compelling tale of a female fixer, who, à la Dexter, dispatches baddies while examining her own dark proclivities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMER JACKSON:  GROWN UP by Teresa E. Harris
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 17, 2011

"With a little bit of sparkle and a whole lot of sass, Summer will be right at home with any young girl eager to enter the work world. (Picture Book. 5-9)"
When 7-year-old Summer Jackson decides she wants to be a grown-up right now, she means it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SCHOOL FOR ATHEISTS by Arno Schmidt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 15, 2001

"Few readers will absorb all of this tale's perverse riches, but when one ardent character proclaims 'We all live in one colossal novel,' it almost makes you wish it were an Arno Schmidt novel."
Another surpassingly strange experimental fiction, originally published in 1972 by "the German Joyce" (1914-79), whose pun-filled derangements of reality have not deterred his indefatigable (and expert) English translator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADAM & EVELYN by Ingo Schulze
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 10, 2011

"A novel rich in dialogue and in its examination of a contemporary fall from grace."
A novel that works on many levels—the personal, the political and even the mythological. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PERFECT PLACE by Teresa E. Harris
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Though good family-in-transition stories are not rare, ones that authentically portray an African-American experience are, and readers will find this one pretty near perfect. (Fiction. 10-13)"
A spirited, stubborn and loyal girl finds the perfect place exactly where she doesn't want it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEAVING SARDINIA by Hans-Ulrich Treichel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 2004

"Deceptively simple, nicely nourishing fiction of the old school."
An emotionally muddled art student's unlucky sexual ventures as he stumbles upon the Sardinian woman of his dreams. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLIGHTS OF LOVE by Bernhard Schlink
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 4, 2001

"Touching, involving short fiction from a writer who eschews bold imagery and stylistic fireworks—and slowly, doggedly gets into your head and under your skin."
A first collection of seven patiently detailed, emotionally complex tales from the German author of the surprise critical success (an Oprah selection) The Reader (1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEW LIVES by Ingo Schulze
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 24, 2008

"Zaftig."
In his hugely ambitious second novel, German wunderkind Schulze (Simple Stories, 2000, etc.) aims to capture the complexity of East Germans' response to reunification through one man's transition from police state rebel to capitalist entrepreneur. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIMPLE STORIES by Ingo Schulze
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 20, 2000

"A first novel that impresses with its cleverness, but ultimately disappoints: Schulze has neglected to create characters interesting enough to make us care what happens to them."
Fragmentation and disintegration—in the body politic and in the realm of human relations'seem to be the themes of this frustratingly cryptic debut novel by the prizewinning young German author (stories: 33 Moments of Happiness, 1998). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"An inspiring story of courage rendered through impressive personal and historical detail."
A deeply sympathetic account of a group of concentration-camp dorm mates who stayed in touch years after their release. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

CHOOSING YOUR OWN PATH
by Leila Roy

Everyone wants something different from me. It’s like one second, I should be a better dude. I should stop being such a girly douche, and I should just man up. Then, it’s the opposite: I’m too much of a guy, and it’s not right. I should be a girl, because that’s what I’m supposed to be.

The thing is, I’m ...


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