Search Results: "Terry Ambrose"


BOOK REVIEW

Con Game by Terry Ambrose
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 29, 2014

"A solid second round of capers featuring this attractive, cynical couple."
In this second installment of the License to Lie mystery series, con artist Roxy Tanner and criminologist Skip Cosgrove contend with a scam gone wrong, death threats and their evolving romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONELY GIANT by Sophie Ambrose
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 13, 2016

"Sweet and effective. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little yellow bird helps a menace mend his destructive ways. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOTHER OF GOD by David Ambrose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"After all, something must replace the weary plotlines of heroines imperiled by the same old psychos."
If artificial intelligence rivaled the human kind, would it choose to live in, refashion, and protect its own environment in the global electronic web? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPERSTITION by David Ambrose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"If the film sticks to Ambrose's terrific ending, instead of going soft like Ghost, this could make one of the scariest, brainiest, most memorable love stories ever made about the unseen. (Film rights to Interscope/ Columbia/Tri-Star)"
Still another hypnotic paranormal thriller from the Great Ambrose (Mother of God, 1996; The Man Who Turned Into Himself, 1994, etc.) that, once again, will drag you unfailingly into the small hours. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DISCRETE CHARM OF CHARLIE MONK by David Ambrose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 2003

"Another all-nighter whose thinly real opening half sets up a dumfounding series of payoffs."
The Great Ambrose returns (Superstition, 1998) for another paranormal thriller that may lack the philosophical darkness of Philip K. Dick but has all of Dick's endless identity inversions and reversals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAN WHO TURNED INTO HIMSELF by David Ambrose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 1994

"Great suspense, with wonderful visual problems for a movie. (First printing of 13,000; film rights to HBO)"
Hypnotic quantum-physics debut, from screenwriter Ambrose, that draws the reader into fabulous parallel worlds a bit like those of Ghost and the post-trauma of Fearless. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 2, 1998

"Meticulously researched and characteristically well told. A compelling and heartfelt tribute to the GI."
Revisiting ground covered previously in his superb Citizen Soldiers (1997) and other works about the climactic European campaigns of 1944—45, distinguished historian Ambrose (Undaunted Courage, 1996, etc.) tells the story of the conquest of Nazism by an array of American, English, and Canadian kids led by the plain-spoken Dwight Eisenhower. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 25, 1970

"Within the limits of this treatment, Ambrose has produced a fine account of the American and Allied war effort in Europe, factually detailed but personally involving."
Stephen Ambrose elected to describe the war years of General Eisenhower from Eisenhower's own frame of reference, an approach which is valid for a biographical study and effectively executed here, but is certainly not without its drawbacks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 17, 1975

"Ambrose is the sort of hearty writer who expresses approval with the phrase 'damned good' and apparently still believes in a manifest destiny which exonerates."
With the centennial of Custer's Last Stand at the Little Big Horn less than a year away, it's likely that we'll have to cope with more than one book on the protagonists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1992

"Hard-nosed, yet ultimately a celebration of grace under pressure in 'the Good War.'"
With his multivolume biographies of Eisenhower and Nixon now complete, Ambrose (History/Univ. of New Orleans) returns to military affairs (Pegasus Bridge, 1985, etc.) with this spirited account of one of the Army's crack WW II units. Read full book review >