Search Results: "Terry Hokenson"


BOOK REVIEW

LEIF'S JOURNEY by Terry Hokenson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 16, 2015

"Readers of the genre will savor this immersive and ultimately satisfying tale of coming of age on the American prairie. (Historical fiction. 11-16)"
Leif, just coming into manhood on the northern prairie of Minnesota in 1881, must either find a way to make peace with his often angry father or leave the farm forever, as his older siblings have chosen to do. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WINTER ROAD by Terry Hokenson
ADVENTURE
Released: May 31, 2006

"Educators will appreciate the non-stereotypical teenage female character and could successfully pair this novel with Gary Paulsen's Hatchet in a thematic unit on survival. (Fiction. 12-15)"
Weather through the initially chilly intra-familial relationships, tinny dialogue and unfamiliar-sounding names to learn how Willa Raedl, 17, survives her plane crash in a snowy wilderness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MILK GOES TO SCHOOL by Terry Border
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 28, 2016

"Border's shtick goes on far too long for readers to want seconds of Milk and Waffle. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Border continues his series of books about anthropomorphized food, this time focusing on Milk and her first day of school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOMBAT & FOX by Terry Denton
ADVENTURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Fans of Dav Pilkey who are ready for something different will chuckle at the wild antics of this jolly band of animal friends. (Fantasy. 6-10)"
This Australian buddy book featuring the titular Wombat and Fox as well as Croc, millionaire Bandicoot, the Hippo Sisters and the naughty, naughty Five Monkeys is sure to please new readers with a wacky sense of humor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RHINO’S HORNS by Michael Terry
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2001

"Extreme close-ups of rhino and baboon, lushly drawn flowers, fruit, and accompanying insects and birds, and the silly arrangements wrapped around the horns help to enhance what is still an age-old theme. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Another take on the hoary conflict of how one who is different and dolorous about it comes to accept the beauty of his own special qualities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOUIS’ DREAM PLANE by Terry Milne
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"The message is certainly meritorious, but the execution is pallid (literally—Milne uses a muted palette throughout) next to such vigorous explorations of the same topic as Holly Keller's Horace's New Toy (2000). (Picture book. 5-8)"
Assorted flying machines adorn the endpapers and will propel young aeronautics fans right into this high-flying story of friendship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOP 10 OF EVERYTHING 2015 by Paul Terry
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"For fans of the form, this compendium has plenty of juice. (index) (Reference. 8-14)"
This collection of top 10 goodies—including "Songs About the Body" and "Amazing Cars for Hire"—has plenty to entertain, if not educate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRICANE by Terry Trueman
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2008

"Reluctant readers may enjoy the plot-driven story of continual peril, but it probably won't leave any lasting impression. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Trueman strains credulity in his fictional recounting of the devastation wrought upon Honduras by Hurricane Mitch in 1998. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHNNY AND THE DEAD by Terry Pratchett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2006

"Humor and honest pathos play off each other to make for an emotionally balanced whole, one whose resolution will be as satisfying to readers as it is to Johnny. (Fiction 10-14)"
Fresh from leading the ScreeWee fleet across hostile game space and back to their own territory, Johnny Maxwell returns to champion a more local group of beings in need: the dead denizens of the local cemetery, slated for redevelopment into Modern Purpose-Designed Offices by United Amalgamated Consolidated Holdings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FIRE THIEF by Terry Deary
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 15, 2005

"Self-consciously Dickensian in cast and theme, this pastiche is likely to leave readers as confused as they are unimpressed. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Deary takes a stab at extending the myth of Prometheus, carving a tale that, despite its satiric edge, manages to miss anything vital, such as an audience. Read full book review >