Search Results: "The Gardeners of Seattle Tilth"


BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Then came the economic bust, and Moody unveils a Seattle true to itself, a city that 'always finds a way to knock itself off the perch of pretension it ascends every few decades or so.'"
Seattle's reputation as an agnostically enlightened outpost—anti-establishment, anti-materialist, anti-upward-mobility, a laid-back and civil burg with an economy designed for people with no measurable drive—has been severely tested over the past two decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LADY CATHERINE, THE EARL, AND THE REAL DOWNTON ABBEY by The Countess of Carnarvon
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Gossipy and fun, with a good history lesson—sure to delight Downton Abbey fans."
A second sprightly memoir by a real English countess (after her Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey) delineates her forebear's heyday from the Roaring '20s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 3, 2009

"An ornamental study, frustratingly lacking in contextual cultivation."
British journalist Wulf (co-author: This Other Eden: Seven Great Gardens and 300 Years of English History, 2005) explores into the personalities that spurred the evolution of the 18th-century English garden. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

Gardeners by Véronique Bizot
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 2017

"Well regarded in France, her native country, Bizot's first appearance in this language is a gift to English-speaking readers."
A slim collection of stories by turns witty, mysterious, and absurd. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 11, 2002

"An excellent job of synthesizing the many voices made available through the newspaper to form a coherent and forceful narrative. (16 pp. b&w insert, not seen)"
The planes came out of the blue, but their intentions were long in the making as New York Times reporter Bernstein (Dictatorship of Virtue, 1994, etc.) explicates in this taut narrative of the events, personalities, and circumstances surrounding the attacks of September 11, 2001. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEAD GO TO SEATTLE by Vivian Faith Prescott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"An uneven but ambitious collection that boldly explores the intersection of magic, queerness, and indigenous history."
In Prescott's debut collection, a young Native American woman confronts colonialism, homophobia, and a history of erasure by reclaiming the stories of her people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BERTHA KNIGHT LANDES OF SEATTLE by Sandra Haarsager
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1994

"A potentially rich subject given a plodding, didactic treatment."
Journalist/Communications professor (Univ. of Idaho) Haarsager on the subject of first woman elected mayor of a major American city (1926-28). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 21, 2010

"The legions of readers of America will know exactly what they're in for—and readers of whatever stripe, save those who are fans of McDonald's and Satan, are likely to enjoy this one."
A goofy guide to our planet, with literate ironist Stewart (America: The Book, 2004) at the helm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"Not a tremendously hopeful work, but Gordon's audaciousness in regarding the condemned as creative citizens is memorable and gripping."
A surprising—and frequently searing—examination of the prison experience, seen from both inside and out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 3, 2016

"Convincing and damning but unlikely to influence U.S. leaders because the electorate largely approves of drone warfare. Apparently killing terrorists takes priority over legal niceties or the deaths of innocent non-Americans."
In this angry but well-documented polemic, journalist Scahill (Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield, 2013, etc.) and his colleagues at the Intercept add to a growing genre that denounces our leaders' fascination with a cheap, seemingly risk-free way to kill terrorists. Read full book review >