Search Results: "Theodore Ross"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"A pleasant collection of honest, critically discriminating encounters with the Jewish faith and culture."
Men's Journal articles editor Ross embarks on a sampling mission of Jewish experiences. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LORD OF THE KILL by Theodore Taylor
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Taylor's cause is a worthy one, but the perfunctory story onto which he loads it is a nonstarter. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Light on plot, heavy on agenda, this sequel to The Sniper (1989) belabors readers with the author's outrage over the illicit use of rare or exotic animals in "canned" hunts and Asian medicine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TO KILL THE LEOPARD by Theodore Taylor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1993

"You really are there."
Realistic submarine suspense, set in WW II, by Taylor (Monocolo, 1989; The Stalker, 1987), who's also written a number of YA novels (The Weirdo, The Cay, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

In the Shadow of Hagia Sophia by Theodore G. Karakostas
Released: Feb. 25, 2013

"Lucid writing and a strong grasp of Byzantine history, with an emphasis on the historical rather than spiritual."
Covering a period of nearly 20 years in the author's life, Karakostas' writing details his visits to various sites important to Greek Orthodox followers, including Hagia Sophia in modern-day Istanbul and the island of Patmos. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LISA AND DAVID/ JORDI/LITTLE RALPHIE by Theodore Isaac Rubin
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1998

"A curious and mostly redundant collection."
Three case histories open readers' eyes to true psychopathology in children. ``Lisa & David'' is a classic, made memorable in the film about two institutionalized teenagers whose developing relationship helps each begin to heal. ``Jordie'' is a composite portrait of a childhood schizophrenic, also previously published. ``Little Ralphie'' is a new study of a teenager who exhibits symptoms of you-name-it: catatonia, schizophrenia, multiple personalities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ICE DRIFT by Theodore Taylor
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"The lack of tension and the uneasy mixture of story and information hamper what has obvious potential, but the plot will attract readers, and the tear-jerking conclusion will satisfy those who go with the floe. (Inuit glossary, author's note) (Fiction. 8-12)"
When a 50-foot-high iceberg crashes into their ice floe, 14-year-old Alika and his younger brother Sulu are separated from land and home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOMB by Theodore Taylor
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Interspersed with brief paragraphs about the development of the bomb and concluding with a factual epilogue, this delivers readers into the middle of a harrowing, if neglected, piece of history. (Fiction. 12+)"
Sorry Rinamu, 14, is happy to see the end of the Japanese occupation of his people's island of Bikini. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARIA by Theodore Taylor
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Predictable but pleasant. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Taylor (The Cay, 1969, plus numerous other adventures) fashions a heartwarmer about a Mexican-American's efforts to get her people included in their California town's Christmas festivities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN INTIMATE HISTORY OF HUMANITY by Theodore Zeldin
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 25, 1995

A courageous, often profound, and extraordinary attempt by one of England's best historians to cut through the pessimism and parochialism of the profession and to find the bonds of humanity underlying its conventional divisions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 1991

"A compelling warning about the Constitutional dangers posed by presidential overreaching in foreign policyoverwhelming at times, but with all the insistent urgency of a fire alarm in the night. (Photographsnot seen.)"
A step-by-step explanation of the labyrinthine scandal that briefly unnerved the Reagan presidency, presented with all the crushing force of a prosecutor's 650-page brief. Read full book review >