Search Results: "Therese Bohman"


BOOK REVIEW

DROWNED by Therese Bohman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 22, 2012

"A slim novel with a taut narrative line and a sense of impending disaster."
A tale of identity and tense personal relationships, one that as a film property would have appealed to Hitchcock or de Palma. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OTHER WOMAN by Therese Bohman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Philosophical, passionate, and pensive—a novel that explores the psychology of both intimacy and lust."
A woman with an almost Dostoevskian loneliness becomes the other woman in this novel of class and passion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 10, 2016

"Useful, practical strategies based on informed analysis."
Insightful advice for women about decisiveness, confidence, and tackling gender bias. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MOON SISTERS by Therese Walsh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 4, 2014

"An uneven mix of magic and sorrow, from a promising writer."
This second novel by Walsh (The Last Will of Moira Leahy, 2010) centers on two sisters—one with synesthesia and one with a pragmatic outlook—as they recover from the suicide of their mother. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIFT OF THE EMPEROR by Therese Park
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"War crimes against women are memorably described here, but, sadly, by characters that seem more like one-dimensional witnesses than vibrantly complex fictional creations."
Newcomer Park offers a graphic but stilted addition to the growing fiction (Nora Okja Keller's Comfort Woman, p. 161; Paul West's The Tent of Orange Mist, 1995, etc.) about Japanese exploitation of thousands of Asian women during WW II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NORTHERN WIND by Therese Park
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 16, 2012

"An espionage adventure that focuses more on its protagonist's emotions and concerns than on James Bond-style aspirations."
In the 1960s, a teenage girl is caught between North and South Korea when she agrees to be a spy for Seoul and go behind enemy lines in Park's (When a Rooster Crows at Night, 2004, etc.) thriller.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST WILL OF MOIRA LEAHY by Therese Walsh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 2009

"Most alive when it focuses on the supposedly mousy twin."
First-time novelist Walsh uneasily combines a romantic adventure about a missing dagger with the psychological story of an adolescent sibling rivalry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LIKE BEING CATHOLIC by Michael Leach
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Catholic readers should not expect an in-depth reaffirmation of their faith, but they may enjoy dipping into the memories and sentiments of those who share their religious heritage."
Simple and honest essays, recollections, and quotations on contemporary Catholic faith and culture in America today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG WAY by Michael Corbin Ray
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 2, 2013

"A fine historical fantasy tale featuring a memorable, tenacious protagonist."
In Ray and Vannier's debut fantasy novel, a young girl flees the hardships of 19th-century China for America, chased by a cruel Englishman who seeks to obtain a dragon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Z by Therese Anne Fowler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 26, 2013

"Fowler has given us a lovely, sad and compulsively readable book."
The Jazz Age revisited through the tumultuous and harrowing life of Zelda. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 20, 2011

"Smith's richly imagined characters breathe life into this look at female friendship in a time of limited social opportunity for women, as well as the enduring power of friendship to transcend almost any challenge."
A combination coming-of-age story and mystery, following Matilda "Tilly" Bettencourt as she struggles against traditional expectations of women in the 1940s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR

"A testament to the human spirit of perseverance in the face of danger and dislocation."
A depiction of the horrors of the second world war, as told largely through van Houten's parents' love letters and diary entries. Read full book review >