Search Results: "Thierry Courtin"


BOOK REVIEW

SEASON SONG by Marcy Barack
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2002

"An appealing first foray into the wonders of Mother Nature, from the Harper Growing Tree series. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Sprightly verses arranged in rhyming couplets describe the various hallmarks of the four seasons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROGGY WENT A-COURTIN’ by Gillian Tyler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"Um-hum. (source note) (Picture book. 6-8)"
Tyler highlights the romance in this frilly version of the folk song, following Froggy and Miss Mousie from courtship to honeymoon in pale, finely brushed outdoor scenes captioned in elegant, if low-contrast, gold ink. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FROGGIE WENT-A-COURTIN’ by Iza Trapani
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2002

"This is a highly enjoyable composite of visually pleasing illustrations and light, catchy text. (Picture book. 2-7)"
In this endearing adaptation of a traditional Scottish folk song, Froggie searches the small animal kingdom for his wife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUT FOR GOOD by Thierry Dedieu
ANIMALS
Released: March 9, 1999

"A fun book to read—but don't encourage children to try the salt trick at home. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Panda and Koala are bored, so they decide to adopt a goldfish as their new friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUNTING FOR FUR by Thierry Dedieu
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Although adults will appreciate the satire, and the irony of such gentle creatures attired as commandoes, children will only see a message of violence: Guns are glorified and that in this case, the end justifies the means. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Violent and menacing imagery darken this sardonic tale, originally published in France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIME FOR BED by Thierry Bedouet
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"Although it's been done before, this simple book models an ideal bedtime routine for both children and caregivers. (Board book. 1-4)"
Originally published in France, this basic board book with sturdy tabs details those moments at the end of the day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO CAPTURE AN INVISIBLE CAT by Paul Tobin
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2016

"This winning, consistently funny, smartly silly adventure could be one of Nate's kooky gadgets, a middle-grade reading attractor. (Adventure. 8-12)"
Sixth-graders Delphine and Nate, aided by Nate's talking dog, Bosper, evade the Red Death Tea Society, an evil organization that excels at both death and brewing, while trying to capture Proton, the family cat, which Nate made both gigantic and invisible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 3, 1990

What forces are responsible for disasters such as the Union Carbide Bhopal accident, the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and the Hinsdale fire that shut down Chicago's telecommunications in 1988? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOLF WHO FELL OUT OF A BOOK by Thierry Robberecht
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 18, 2017

"Attractive and initially inventive but ultimately lacking in substance. (Picture book. 4-8)"
When a toothy black wolf falls out of a book in a little girl's overstuffed library, he learns that real life can be much scarier than fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAM’S NEW FRIEND by Thierry Robberecht
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 21, 2008

"Could adults ask for more in a character? (Picture book. 3-6)"
Sam the wolf is back for his third outing, this time learning lessons about friendship and peer pressure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BACK INTO MOMMY’S TUMMY by Thierry Robberecht
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Engagingly silly yet compassionate, this is a perfect tale to present to soon-to-be or fledging siblings. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A five-year-old girl presents her mother with an unusual birthday request in this insightful tale from Robberecht. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO OUTSMART A BILLION ROBOT BEES by Paul Tobin
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2017

"Fans of How to Capture an Invisible Cat (2015) will find an agreeable extension of its high jinks. (Science fantasy. 8-12)"
Having "stabilized Nothingness" with gravity waves, supergenius Nate Bannister has created an Infinite Engine, and the nefarious Red Death Tea Society is naturally out to get it. Read full book review >