Search Results: "Thomas C. Clarie"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 15, 2010

"An impressive compendium that could nevertheless be formed into a more compelling story."
As a theater for the performing arts faces destruction at the hands of a commercial developer, friends of the theater join forces to preserve it for future generations in this work of historical nonfiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PHAROS by Thomas C. Clarie
NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2009

"A well-researched, engaging history enhanced by high-quality illustrations."
Clarie (Just Rye Harbor, 2005) serves up a feast of history and legend surrounding the Egyptian city of Alexandria and Pharos, its once-upon-a-time lighthouse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

C by Tom McCarthy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Flawed but fascinating."
An ambitious, epochal second novel from the author of Remainder (2007). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"The end result ought to be risible, but Jarvis pulls it off, to stunning effect. (Horror. 10-14)"
A rousing tale of horror and heroism, this last prequel to the Deptford Mice trilogy stands well alone, as the doughty shipmouse Thomas Triton at last reveals his tragic past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FORMAT C: by Edwin Black
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 15, 1999

"Others, perhaps, will not, although Black throughout shows great smarts and at times displays virtuoso rhetoric. (First printing of 50,000; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Massively conceived, neatly chiseled computer novel that begins on the wrong foot with lists of consumer goods enjoyed by a sybaritic hero only a Honda Del Sol salesman could love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 8, 2005

"An Israeli version of Anthony Swofford's Jarhead (2004), both hard-nosed and thoughtful—and most illuminating."
A nuanced view of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict by a former foot soldier in the long war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIDDLE C by William H. Gass
Released: March 12, 2013

"Gass, now 88, clearly has endings on his mind, which he addresses with fearsome brio and wit."
Misanthropy, atrocity, the Midwest—Gass revisits some familiar themes in this novel, though this ride is smoother than its epic predecessor, The Tunnel (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMPANY C by John Sack
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"Readers in search of a gritty grunt's-eye view of the Gulf War will be far better served by Carsten Stroud's estimable Iron Bravo (1995)."
A journalist's perfervid, impressionistic, and ultimately pointless take on an American armored unit that survived Desert Storm with a minimum of combat casualties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Some mild friction between two bright men sparks striking observations about music."
Edited transcripts of nine intense interviews with the celebrated British composer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DYLAN THOMAS by Andrew Lycett
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 4, 2004

"Scrupulously researched but overly detailed."
The British biographer of Ian Fleming and Rudyard Kipling memorializes the chaotic and abbreviated existence of the 20th century's most Romantic poet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOUBTING THOMAS by Atle Naess
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 11, 2000

This 1997 novel by a prominent Norwegian author assembles the testimony of nine "witnesses" to explain a scandalous incident in the year 1606: it seems the celebrated (and impulsive) painter killed a man in a duel, then fled from Rome into a prolonged exile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THOMAS MANN by Ronald Hayman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 1995

"An important, accomplished work, containing the outlines of a less professional, more passionate look at Mann and his family that, while yet unwritten, might someday provide drama to match the master's. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Veteran biographer Hayman (Tennessee Williams, 1994, etc.) painstakingly traces the great German novelist's progress from anatomist of fin-de-siäcle decadence to august personification of his nation's conscience. Read full book review >