Search Results: "Thomas Kingsley Troupe"


BOOK REVIEW

THE BIG HAIRY SECRET by Thomas Kingsley Troupe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2013

"Chapter-book readers should latch onto it. (Fantasy. 6-8)"
The Corman Towers apartment building has a creepy outside; wait till Flo sees the inside! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EREC REX by Kaza Kingsley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"That, along with a notably quirky supporting cast and plenty of heroic behavior, combines to carry readers through. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
Erec (think Harry), "a normal boy with a few minor exceptions," spends most of his second outing in the magical land of Alypium angry at King Piter (think Dumbledore) and others for refusing to reveal his real identity and parentage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON DRINK by Kingsley Amis
Released: Oct. 24, 1973

"MPSLUGMISTER Amis."
Amis disclaims all responsibility for dipsomaniacs (a special case) but this should be everyone else's indispensable guide to alcoholic bliss. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 8, 1971

"The right bright word is always in its right, striking place."
"The man's name is Ames," said the late Evelyn Waugh so pontifically that the discussion of Mr. Amis's work was broken off at that point. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAKE'S THING by Kingsley Amis
Released: June 26, 1980

"The Amis prose glitters throughout as shark-toothily as ever, but the Amis bile isn't the geyser it once was-more like a leaky faucet."
A savage, often unfunny and unfocused adieu to sex—at least as it's practiced in the "permissive society." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIVERSIDE VILLAS MURDER by Kingsley Amis
Released: Sept. 1, 1973

"Not much of a game, as we indicated (a bloodied victim walks through the windows of Peter's house to lie fallen cold and dead) — not as seductive as his ghost story The Green Man — but a bit of cheerful nostalgia for those who mourn the demise of the red herring on the garden path."
Kingsley Amis, that literary traveling man, has written about the classical detective story which he admires (particularly John Dickson Carr's wheezy Dr. Fell) and now he has emulated the form which succeeds far better as a send-up than a story — that is a crime story since these elements, particularly the denouement, are sheer "kerfuffle." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEMOIRS by Kingsley Amis
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"Depthless, but the pace and variety will keep many awake."
Amis's "autobiography"—or, more accurately—portraits of his acquaintances after a few opening chapters on his family, school days, and life at Oxford. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIFFICULTIES WITH GIRLS by Kingsley Amis
Released: April 5, 1989

After winning the Booker Prixe for his last novel, an inspired satire on aging adulterers (The Old Devils), Amis here aims his barbed wit at an easy target—the cultural excesses of the Sixties. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CRIME OF THE CENTURY by Kingsley Amis
Released: Oct. 16, 1989

"Sporadically entertaining—with occasional Amis drolleries—but too episodic, arbitrary, and just-plain-silly to sustain interest."
Don't get your hopes up, fans of The Riverside Villas Murder (1973). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE FAT ENGLISHMAN by Kingsley Amis
Released: Feb. 26, 1963

Kingsley Amis, who has often claimed that his intention was to write funny books, has never succeeded in doing so as well as he did in Lucky Jim. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"An informative, sometimes vivid, anecdotal survey that shies away from breakthrough interpretations of the artistic revolution staged almost 50 years ago. (Photographs—including eight pages of color—not seen.)"
A study of Abstract Expressionism by an art journalist and curator who takes 1950 as the movement's decisive year. Read full book review >