Search Results: "Thomas L. Hay"


BOOK REVIEW

HAY by Paul Muldoon
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"When he eschews cleverness for its own sake, Muldoon enlists his considerable technical skill in undermining his own conceits: he's clearly a major young poet in any case."
The Irish-born Princeton professor dazzles the ear with his eighth book of verse; full of inventive rhyme and repetitions, and seamless meters, Muldoon's work resembles the monk of his poem —Anonymous—: 'sharp-witted, swift, and sure.— A linguistic voluptuary, Muldoon sometimes leaves readers behind with his gestures to Apollinaire, and his dense Joycean patter; but his best poems ground his visionary sensibility in everyday observation: —The Mudroom— and two poems titled —The Bangle,— in particular, rely on a collage of imagery and idiom, from Yiddish slang, Asian clarity, and classical allusion to the common items found in a mudroom (hubcap, extra fridge, soft drinks). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN ABDUCTION REVELATION by Thomas L. Hay
Released: Oct. 3, 2012

"An amusing sci-fi/memoir curiosity."
Hay (The Comeback Kid, 2011) revises his first memoir in light of new extraterrestrial details. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"The end result ought to be risible, but Jarvis pulls it off, to stunning effect. (Horror. 10-14)"
A rousing tale of horror and heroism, this last prequel to the Deptford Mice trilogy stands well alone, as the doughty shipmouse Thomas Triton at last reveals his tragic past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1993

"An unsparing and perceptive briefing on a pocketbook issue whose complexities appear beyond the grasp of mass media."
A journalist's informed audit of the factors that brought America's S&Ls to grief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"An election-year must-read."
Becker's novel, republished from 1995, imagines an alternate political reality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT THE L? by Kate Clinton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2005

"Veers wildly among topics, but covers recent political history and gay rights issues with rapid-fire, sometimes blessedly cathartic humor."
Lesbian comic Clinton (Don't Get Me Started, 1998, etc.) riffs on everything from SpongeBob SquarePants to the Supreme Court in this ultra-wry collection of columns and short essays. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

'L' IS FOR LAWLESS by Sue Grafton
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 4, 1995

"Minor work for Kinsey ('K'' is for Killer, 1994, etc.), who appears in just about every role imaginablecheerleader, traffic cop, accessory after the fact to the felonious hunters of Johnny Lee's treasure. She's everything, in fact, except a detective."
Just a few days before she's to be a bridesmaid at her ancient landlord Henry Pitts's Thanksgiving wedding, Kinsey Millhone agrees to help her late neighbor John Lee's family recover enough money from the Veteran's Administration to pay for his burial, and it's all downhill from there for Kinsey's bridesmaid's plans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 21, 1992

"A well-timed clarion call that ultimately mirrors its own picture of the philosophy it celebrates—messy, vital, infuriating, and invigorating."
A spirited defense of American liberalism that proves every bit as engaging and cantankerous (and wordy) as its subtitle. Read full book review >