Search Results: "Thomas Powers"


BOOK REVIEW

POWERS by Ursula K. Le Guin
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Billed as a 'companion' to Gifts (2004) and Voices (2006), in its musing on this power of story, it complements them beautifully, though readers hoping to reacquaint themselves with characters met in the first two novels will find themselves disappointed until the very end. (Fiction. YA)"
Reared in slavery, Gavir knows and understands his place in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POWERS by Deborah Lynn Jacobs
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2006

"Jacobs writes Gwen's chapters in past tense and Adrian's in present, which is distracting; otherwise, a bewitchingly pulpy and enjoyable fast read. (Fantasy. YA)"
Two teenagers make sparks fly . . . really! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"The end result ought to be risible, but Jarvis pulls it off, to stunning effect. (Horror. 10-14)"
A rousing tale of horror and heroism, this last prequel to the Deptford Mice trilogy stands well alone, as the doughty shipmouse Thomas Triton at last reveals his tragic past. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EXTRAORDINARY POWERS by Joseph Finder
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"The complex story purrs along like a high-powered race car loaded with options, even though it all boils down to Telepathic Man and a bunch of lesser guys with guns after the big score. (First printing of 100,000)"
Soviet spy maven Finder (The Moscow Club, 1991) adapts to the disappearance of the Red Menace—without missing a step—by following the trail of $10 billion spirited out of Russia to protect it from hard-liners: a fortune in gold that's rearranging a lot of loyalties from Moscow to Washington. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TWIN POWERS by Robert Lipsyte
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"An agreeably quick-paced time-travel romp. (Science fiction. 10-14)"
Double the adventure continues in this stand-alone sequel to The Twinning Project (2012).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONFIRMATION by Thomas Powers
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 6, 2000

"Astoundingly detailed with regard to behind-the-scenes Washington, both in the halls of Congress and at CIA headquarters, but, as may seem clear enough, a tad far-fetched and overwrought."
A first novel from the Pulitzer-winning journalist (Heisenberg's War, 1993, etc.) examines one of his areas of expertise—the CIA—in a tale of integrity at odds with entrenched bureaucracy, with the fate of a long-missing Vietnam POW hanging in the balance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2006

"A provocative reconsideration of early modern European history."
British historian Burleigh (The Third Reich, 2000) examines the rise of "the religion of politics," a cultural shift that gathered force in the late-18th century and paved the way for the omnipotent-state ideologies of the 20th. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE KILLING OF CRAZY HORSE by Thomas Powers
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 7, 2010

"A skillful synthesis of historical research and contested narrative, resonant with enduring loss."
Sprawling account of the grim conclusion of the Indian Wars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 2, 1993

Why did the Third Reich, for all its industrial might and technological resources, fail to create a nuclear bomb? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 5, 2005

"Well reasoned and argued, if unlikely to influence the people who could most stand to read it."
Elect a president, get a war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 15, 1992

A sophisticated and sympathetic look at nonconventional healing methods and their place in a pluralistic democracy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EARTHLY POWERS by Anthony Burgess
Released: Dec. 1, 1980

"Despite all the issues and debates, then: an essentially skin-deep entertainment, chiefly for savvy Anglophiles and theologically inclined littÉrateurs, which—as Toomey says of his own work—takes unprofound material and manages 'to elevate it through wit, allusion and irony to something like art."
Much too, long and just as loosely assembled as his other recent novels, Burgess' latest black-comic variation on man's sin and God's cruel tricks does have, however, an engagingly grandiose design: the life of homosexual, lapsed-Catholic Kenneth Toomey—a popular, second-rate novelist/playwright whose dates (1890-1971) and connections embrace most of the sexual, artistic, and religious pressure points of the century's first half. Read full book review >