Search Results: "Thomas Wolfe"


BOOK REVIEW

THE PARTY AT JACK'S by Thomas Wolfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 17, 1995

"A Thomas Wolfe Companion."
Thomas Wolfe's determined stab at a richly finished short novel on the order of Heart of Darkness and The Great Gatsby attempts a passionately deeper cut at American life than Fitzgerald's. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOOD CHILD'S RIVER by Thomas Wolfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 1991

"An often stunningly disciplined first draft—by a genius."
Fragmented, newly uncovered novel by Wolfe, found in his ledgers and written at the summit of his descriptive powers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

O LOST by Thomas Wolfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 3, 2000

"Perhaps you can go home again. A strange and lovely return indeed, for which much thanks to the enterprising Bruccolis."
The famous first version of Look Homeward, Angel (1929), Wolfe's titanic debut novel that had been whipped into publishable shape by Scribner editor Maxwell Perkins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST BOY by Thomas Wolfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 26, 1992

"Here, it appears with cuts restored."
A year before his own premature death in 1938, Wolfe wrote this slender and evocative novella about the long-ago and sudden death by typhoid of his older brother Grover, an event that took place in 1904, when Grover was 12 and Wolfe only four. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE TOY SHOP by Frances Wolfe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 14, 2008

"Wolfe's oil paintings far exceed her text, as her attractive illustrations exhibit sophisticated perspectives, appealing human characters and a dear little bunny who deserves better narration. (Picture book. 3-6)"
This overlong and too-sentimental story is set in a toy shop owned by a gentle, white-haired man named Mr. Kringle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOK! by Gillian Wolfe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Brief biographies of each artist follow the body of the text. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Wolfe, head of education at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, uses 18 paintings to hone observation skills and teach art history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOK! by Gillian Wolfe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"A lively and sophisticated introduction to the art of close reading a painting. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-12)"
A well-chosen selection of paintings spanning the centuries serves as examples of how artists convey meaning. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENDANGERED SPECIES by Gene Wolfe
Released: March 20, 1989

A substantial collection of 34 tales, many previously uncollected, from the renowned author of, most recently, There Are Doors (1988), ranging from horror and fantasy to speculative and hard science fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST BILLABLE HOUR by Susan *Wolfe
Released: March 21, 1989

Flawed but appealing: a mystery debut set at a Silicon Valley law firm, with amusingly precise glimpses of attorney gamesmanship and a mostly endearing (somewhat overdrawn) nebbish-hero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RETURN TO THE WHORL by Gene Wolfe
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"For the rest of us mere mortals, Wolfe's grace and power evoke gleams of admiration even as we float away on a tide of indifference."
This, the third and final part of Wolfe's Short Sun trilogy (In Green's Jungles, p. 842), itself a sequel to a tetralogy, the Book of the Long Sun, concludes the saga of Patera Silk, the one-time ruler of an immense starship, the Whorl, the story's narrator, Horn, various other characters—some of whom may have become a composite—and the planets that Whorl's colonists have populated. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 25, 1993

"Too cluttered, and blemished by sly jibes at Judaism and Christianity, but still memorable as travelogue and Islamic apologetic."
A rare firsthand account, by an American writer and recent Muslim convert, of a journey to the geographical heart of ``the least understood of the world's great religions.'' Wolfe postpones his trip to Mecca until the second half of his narrative, preceding it with a colorful but meandering description of his sojourn in Morocco. Read full book review >