Search Results: "Timothy Garton Ash"


BOOK REVIEW

FREE SPEECH by Timothy Garton Ash
NON-FICTION
Released: May 24, 2016

"A thorough and well-argued contribution to the quest for global free speech norms."
A field guide to the challenges of setting standards for free speech in a "cosmopolis" of diverse cultures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 2004

"That would be a surprising future indeed, and Ash (History of the Present, 2000, etc.) makes a good case for why it, too, should not be considered chimerical."
Americans are from Mars, Europeans from Venus, so goes the current right-wing formulation. But, warns British journalist/historian Ash, beware the attendant bigotry: "If we hear a voice generalizing angrily about ‘the Americans' or ‘the Europeans,' the disease is close." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FILE by Timothy Garton Ash
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Sensitive, subtle, and illuminating, as a fine historian explores those infinitely complicated choices made by human beings confronted by the issue of collaboration or resistance. (First serial to the New Yorker; author tour)"
A British historian has the eerie experience of reading the secret file kept on him by the Stasi, the East German secret police, and meeting with those who informed on him and the police who were responsible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 26, 2000

"An invaluable contemporary account of how millions of Europeans have taken divergent paths—of compromise or conflict—in reaction to a decade of unanticipated change."
Ash (The File: A Personal History, not reviewed) acts as informed, impassioned eyewitness to post-communist Europe in this collection of dazzling essays, most of which were originally published in the New York Review of Books. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 8, 2006

"Timothy the tortoise is a splendid social critic, a keen-eyed anthropologist who sees far beyond his shell."
A dazzling riff on human beings and their weird ways "written" by an 18th-century tortoise that lived for years in the garden of English naturalist/curate Gilbert White and appeared in White's The Natural History of Selborne (1789). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASH by Malinda Lo
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Beautiful language magically wrought; beautiful storytelling magically told. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
An unexpected reimagining of the Cinderella tale, exquisite and pristine, unfolding deliberately. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASH by Lisa Rowe Fraustino
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 1995

"A valuable look at adolescent schizophrenia. (Fiction. 12+)"
How does a family handle mental illness when it appears in their midst? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASH by James Herbert
Released: Dec. 11, 2012

"A yarn that has almost everything wrong with it, yet still reveals a compelling truth."
Curious blend of supernatural horror and conspiracy theory, from the veteran ghost-chaser (The Secret of Crickley Hall, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIMOTHY LEARY by Robert Greenfield
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 5, 2006

"A thorough, sternly bemused biography."
The lurid, yet strangely naïve life of the Harvard psychologist and LSD guru. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRE & ASH by Jonathan Maberry
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 13, 2013

"In the end, this gripping zombie saga is really about Hope & Love. (Science fiction. 13 & up)"
Maberry delivers a fitting conclusion to his popular Rot & Ruin series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. TIMOTHY by Louis Bayard
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 2003

"Still, a clever premise and smartly detailed prose manage to offset the disappointment of this tale's forced excitement."
Tiny Tim has grown up in this uneven effort: an intriguing reexamination of Dickens's beloved waif, saddled with a not altogether successful thriller, à la The Alienist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASH FALLS by Warren  Read
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2017

"A moody, haunting foray into rural Americana in the mold of Daniel Woodrell and Christian Kiefer."
A man's past haunts the citizens of an isolated, rural Pacific Northwest town. Read full book review >