Search Results: "Tina Holdcroft"


BOOK REVIEW

OLD MACDONALD HAD HER FARM by JonArno Lawson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"High-energy ride to nowhere. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A new take on the old song highlights the role of vowels in the English language. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPY, SPY AGAIN by Tina Holdcroft
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"James Bond would cringe at these cleverly reconstructed espionage failures; kids will eat them up. (bibliography) (Graphic nonfiction. 10-14)"
Holdcroft presents 20 bungled spy plots in high-mirth graphic format. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT THE SNAKES WROTE by Hazel Hutchins
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2013

"Strictly for reptile fans; Hutchins' one-note tale and Holdcroft's illustrations are both rough and unsubtle. Two appended pages of interesting snake facts are the highlights here. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Garter snakes use spelling skills to enlist lifesaving help. Who knew? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KIDS AT THE CROSSROADS: AZTEC by Laura Scandiffio
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2009

"Both volumes try for too much and end up offering neither a properly developed story line nor a coherent picture of their narrators' historical contexts. (Infofiction. 10-12)"
In faux blog posts, a young resident of Tenochtitlán describes his training at a military school, confused melees with bands of warriors from rival cities and the portent-ridden arrival of Cortés. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLY, LITTLE BIRD by Tina Burke
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

"Pre-readers and readers alike will enjoy this visual treat that tickles the funny bone while providing a tender reflection on friendship. (Picture book. 2-6)"
In her debut, Burke offers readers the essence of picture book: a nearly wordless work for which she relies on her expressive watercolors to tell the tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE by Tina Packer
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"Prefaced by a lively account of Shakespeare's career, theater, and big themes, these frank, witty, sad, melodramatic, heartrending versions effectively capture the originals' timeless art—and heart. (Nonfiction. 11-15)"
Featuring inviting design, near-transparent prose, and an all-star cast of illustrators, this collection of retold Shakespearean stories should become a front runner in a decidedly crowded field. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"An intelligent examination of a complex issue, a useful corrective to the euphoria of the West in the wake of its ostensible victory in the Cold War."
MacArthur Foundation grant recipient Rosenberg follows her acclaimed study of Latin America's transition to democracy, Children of Cain (1991), with a similar look at Eastern Europe, specifically, the former Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Germany. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RECKONING AND RUIN by Tina Whittle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2016

"Readers new to Tai's adventures (Deeper than the Grave, 2014, etc.) may be put off by all the back story. Those enamored of her will enjoy the way it drives the plot, which is most likely to appeal to those with a strong investment in the heroine."
Headstrong and determined, a woman trying to leave her past behind is forced back to her Savannah home to confront her biggest adversaries: her family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRONSKIN by Tina Connolly
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"An intriguing and ambitious fantasy tale."
Connolly, in her debut, delivers a supernatural spin on Jane Eyre set in a gothic, alternate version of the Victorian era, in the aftermath of a war with powerful, forest-dwelling beings called the fey. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNAIL AND WORM AGAIN by Tina Kügler
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 28, 2017

"Again! Again! (Picture book/early reader. 4-7)"
Three funny stories about two fast friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN I GROW UP by Tina Louise
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2007

Urging the Oshkosh set to start thinking about future careers, Louise pairs familiar animal activities to adult occupations—"If a spider can build a beautiful web . . . when I grow up, I can be an architect!"—but it's the kaleidoscopic, super-bright illustrations that may linger longest with emergent and pre-readers. Read full book review >