Search Results: "Tina Kuna"


BOOK REVIEW

TINA MODOTTI by Margaret Hooks
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 18, 1993

"A bit marred by unleavened prose, but a thorough account in words and photographs of an exceptional woman whose tragic life was nevertheless one of uncommon achievement. (125 b&w photographs)"
Hooks (a Mexico-based journalist) offers a well-researched, deeply sympathetic, and superbly illustrated biography of the passionate Tina Modotti (1896-1942), whose love of Communism, photography, and men made her a legend in her own time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TINA MODOTTI by Pino Cacucci
Released: March 23, 1999

"A life of mystery, passion, dedication, and talent that begs, 'Tell us more.' (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Here's a blockbuster romance waiting to be filmed: Beautiful, gifted Italian immigrant turns Soviet spy and is loved by Edward Weston, befriended by Diego Rivera and Frieda Kahlo, and, after her mysterious death, mourned by Pablo Neruda. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEARCHING FOR TINA TURNER by Jacqueline E.  Luckett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 27, 2010

"The fact that the characters happen to be African-American adds nothing to this standard woman's empowerment romance."
Wealthy California matron in midlife crisis uses the veteran entertainer as her role model in Luckett's debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TINA AND THE PENGUIN by Heather Dyer
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Funny bits demonstrate the text; don't miss the penguin in the refrigerator or the room full of penguin feathers. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A penguin stages a breakout from the zoo, aided and abetted by young Tina, in this toast to good intentions, no matter they go astray. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2011

"While not exactly groundbreaking, the evidence in this book will motivate parents to make mealtime a priority."
Family supper receives the star treatment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUT OF THE EGG by Tina Matthews
ANIMALS
Released: March 6, 2007

"Opening scenes of a junk-strewn industrial wasteland that is transformed by the end into grassy, rolling hills add an environmental subtext to this seemingly simple yet multilayered import. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Illustrated with scarlet poultry that pops right out of the black-and-white woodcut illustrations, this variation on "Little Red Hen" offers unusual visual impact, as well as a gentle suggestion that children are not culpable for the sins of their parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNAIL AND WORM AGAIN by Tina Kügler
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 28, 2017

"Again! Again! (Picture book/early reader. 4-7)"
Three funny stories about two fast friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLY, LITTLE BIRD by Tina Burke
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2006

"Pre-readers and readers alike will enjoy this visual treat that tickles the funny bone while providing a tender reflection on friendship. (Picture book. 2-6)"
In her debut, Burke offers readers the essence of picture book: a nearly wordless work for which she relies on her expressive watercolors to tell the tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNAIL AND WORM by Tina Kügler
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 3, 2016

"Friendship and the difficulty of clear communication are the basis for the conflict between classic duos like Frog and Toad, George and Martha, and Elephant and Piggie. None of these need to fear being replaced by Snail and Worm. (Early reader. 6-9)"
Three stories told in mostly one-syllable sight words for beginning readers introduce yet another odd-couple pair of animal friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPY, SPY AGAIN by Tina Holdcroft
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"James Bond would cringe at these cleverly reconstructed espionage failures; kids will eat them up. (bibliography) (Graphic nonfiction. 10-14)"
Holdcroft presents 20 bungled spy plots in high-mirth graphic format. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOOD, ASH, AND BONE by Tina Whittle
Released: March 5, 2013

"The plot is as deftly convoluted as ever (Darker Than Any Shadow, 2012, etc.), but this time, most everything takes a back seat to Tai's rapture over Trey. And who could blame her? He's one hell of a catch."
Tai Randolph, the cutest amateur sleuth to come along since Stephanie Plum stuck her nose in everyone's business, rouses the ire of the KKK. Read full book review >