Search Results: "Tobias S. Bucknell"


BOOK REVIEW

DIVERSE ENERGIES by Tobias S.  Bucknell
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"Careful, curious readers will be rewarded, though probably not comforted, by the many realities and futures imagined here. (Science fiction/anthology. 12 & up)"
As the title promises, this sophisticated science-fiction anthology is diverse in nearly every sense of the word. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TALE OF TOBIAS by Jan Mark
adapted by Jan Mark, illustrated by Rachel Merriman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Newcomer Merriman creates sand- colored, unfussy paintings, with eccentric perspectives and idiosyncratic faces and features. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Mark (Fun With Mrs. Thumb, 1993, etc.) offers a story from the Apocrypha, a collection of biblical books included in ancient versions of the Old Testament, about a young man who saves his family from destitution with the assistance of an angel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF TOBIAS by Sylvie Germain
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 10, 2000

"An acquired taste, her ineffably odd books are nevertheless highly accomplished performances."
The most recent (1998) of Germain's highly charged Gothic antiromances set in the French countryside (close kin to her The Book of Nights and Night of Amber) is a quirky retelling of the biblical apocryphal tale of Tobias. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ARCTIC RISING by Tobias S. Buckell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"Buckell successfully draws the reader in with his characters and ideas, only to blow things up a little too thoroughly by the end."
This fast-paced near-future thriller delivers a combination of geopolitical intrigue and technological speculation, only flagging as it reaches its jumbled conclusion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S&M by Jeffrey DeShell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1997

STATEMENT PAGE Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HURRICANE FEVER by Tobias S. Buckell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2014

"So don't wait for a dark and stormy night to read this novel; you'll have plenty of fun."
A stormy, aptly named thriller set in the Caribbean of the near future. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. S by George Jacobs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2003

"Deliciously gossipy, yet Sinatra is recalled with affection rather than spite."
As-told-to memoir of life with the famous crooner by his African-American Man Friday, lubricated with racy tales about the stars, the Kennedys, and the Mob. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S/Z by Roland Barthes
Released: Sept. 9, 1974

"Barthes has brought new life to a foundering literary aesthetics with this synthesis of science and imaginative humanism, for those familiar with the terminology."
In this essential application of structural linguistics to the problems of literary criticism, Roland Barthes—a disciple of Saussure and one of the cardinal spokesmen of semiology—opposes both the goals and methods of classic rhetoric. Read full book review >