Search Results: "Tom Doctoroff"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 22, 2012

"A no-nonsense book by an enlightened capitalist."
A primer on Chinese consumers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOAT WORKS by Tom Slaughter
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 29, 2012

"No need for a life jacket; all these vessels glide smoothly into port. (Board book. 1-3)"
When you sail away on these seas, the vessel can be any you choose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

1000 TIMES NO by Tom Warburton
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2009

"This clever, appealing concept is sure to be a hit with the very young; with gentle humor and a cartoon-like atmosphere, the expressive pictures beautifully capture the point of view and opinionated stance of a two-year-old who believes he knows exactly what he wants. (Picture book. 3-6)"
There are many ways to say "no," and when Mom says it's time to leave, Baby Noah uses them all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERYTHING I KNOW ABOUT CARS by Tom Lichtenheld
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2005

"Replete with appropriately daffy cartoon illustrations, here's a gassed-up laff-fest that will keep readers roaring back for more. (Picture book. 7-9)"
"100% fact-free," but "Chock-a-block full of stuff!," this does for cars and car travel what Everything I Know About Pirates (2000) did for pirates—which is to say, puts a maniacally silly spin on every common myth, misconception, and factoid the over-caffeinated author can conjure up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE, TWO, THREE by Tom Slaughter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

For children at the very dawn of numeracy, Slaughter's paper collages offers one-to-ten counting (and modern art) practice on a set of commonplace, easily recognizable items—an apple, eyeglasses, buttons, beach balls, and the like—all rendered with utmost simplicity in bright primary colors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE VS. YELLOW by Tom Sullivan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"Minor flaws aside, the book presents color blending in an entertaining way. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Two circles of different colors compete to prove each is the best in the latest from the creator of I Used to Be a Fish (2016). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 2002

"A story of dedication whose author merges with the object of his passion as much as any great violinist or cook."
Master bass fisherman, fishing-equipment entrepreneur, and regional TV personality Mann lets fly a homespun, anecdote-rich memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUBBLE TROUBLE by Tom Percival
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 2, 2015

"The book treads familiar friendship territory and ends up feeling as insubstantial as, well, a bubble. (Picture book. 2-6)"
How much trouble can a bubble really cause? You'd be surprised. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMPEROR PICKLETINE RIDES THE BUS by Tom Angleberger
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 12, 2014

"One last time: 'stooky!' (Er, 'fantastic!') (Graphic/fiction hybrid. 9-12)"
A daylong field trip without origami? Nostrul! Er, awful! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERMAN'S LETTER by Tom Percival
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Hibernation, dedication and one long-distance friendship that will never be forgotten: a must-have when a friend moves away. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Best friends Herman and Henry pledge to stay that way through letters when Henry has to move. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STRANGE CASE OF ORIGAMI YODA by Tom Angleberger
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2010

"A skewed amalgam of Wayside Stories and Wimpy Kid that is sure to please fans of both. (Origami Yoda instructions) (Fiction. 8-12)"
Sixth grader Tommy has a dilemma: He doesn't know whether to trust the advice of Origami Yoda, who dispenses wisdom from his perch on the finger of mega-nerd Dwight. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIDGET’S BERET by Tom Lichtenheld
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 27, 2010

"A witty, well-shaped story about the dubious necessity of lucky hats and a clever homage to many of the Great Artists and their works, from Leonardo to Warhol. ('How to Start Your Art' idea section) (Picture book. 5-8)"
Bridget thinks she gets her artistic abilities from the black beret she, along with all the Great Artists, always wears. Read full book review >