Search Results: "Tom Feelings"


BOOK REVIEW

FEELINGS! by Tad Carpenter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"Carpenter's predicable, interactive titles in the I Say, You Say series offer appealing introductions to basic concepts just right for toddlers and preschoolers. (Picture book. 1-3)"
This new addition to the I Say, You Say series invites a young audience to playfully explore the world of emotions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOUL LOOKS BACK IN WONDER by Tom Feelings
POETRY
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"An outstandingly beautiful and powerful book. (Poetry/Picture book. 7+)"
Continuing the reflection and celebration of African-American experiences begun in Something On My Mind (with Nikki Grimes, 1978) and Daydreamers (with Eloise Greenfield, 1981), Feelings pairs 13 poems (either new or, for the most part, previously inaccessible) by Maya Angelou, Langston Hughes, Walter Dean Myers, Margaret Walker, et al., with complex artwork involving blueprinting, stencilling, collage, and spray-painting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOMMY TRAVELER IN THE WORLD OF BLACK HISTORY by Tom Feelings
HISTORY
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"Working competently within the genre, Feelings demonstrates talent but little hint of the breadth and power of his subsequent work; still, Tommy succeeds in his original intention of introducing black history with pride, in an easily accessible format with popular appeal. (Nonfiction. 5+)"
Feelings, a widely respected illustrator who received a Caldecott Honor for Moja Means One (1971), originally published these comic-strip vignettes in a local newspaper in 1958 and 1959. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Illustrated books are a natural extension of [the] African oral tradition'' of storytelling, writes Caldecott Award-winning artist Tom Feelings. Here, in 64 powerful black-and-white paintings—some of them harshly realistic, others nightmarishly phantasmagoric—this noted artist tells a neglected part of the story of African-American slavery: the cruel journey known as "the middle passage,'' in which millions, perhaps tens of millions, of Africans died before ever reaching American shores. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Daniel Torres
by Daniel Torres, translated by Julie Simmons-Lynch, illustrated by Daniel Torres
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Then again, this book is supposed to be about art, so maybe the words don't matter. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Torres's first book is a big tribute to New York City and a little satire about the superficiality of the public's taste in art, wrapped in a story about a dinosaur. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Lyle Leverich
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Affectionate and affecting, dense with arresting detail, likely to be definitive. (50 b&w photos, not seen) (First printing of 50,000; first serial to the New Yorker)"
Artistically and psychologically acute biography of the great American poet-playwright. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Tomie dePaola
by Tomie dePaola, illustrated by Tomie dePaola
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A delightfully offbeat vignette of boyish mischief reinforcing the bond between generations; dePaola's handsomely designed illustrations have unusual warmth here, subtly expressing the characters' affection. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another autobiographical story from dePaola, this time about his grandfather, who ingenuously explains that "We're named after each other, Tommy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILD FEELINGS by David Milgrim
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A picture book to feel good about. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A compassionate look at feelings uses animal similes to affirm universal human emotions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARD FEELINGS by Jason Starr
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 15, 2002

"Starr (Nothing Personal, 2000, etc.) makes all the right noir moves, but if noir to you means no more than dismal, be warned: you won't easily stomach self-hating, rancorous Richard."
For Richard Segal, these are the deep-dyed worst of times. Read full book review >