Search Results: "Tom Holt"


BOOK REVIEW

FLYING DUTCH by Tom Holt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 1992

"The Flying Dutchman's problem is tedium, and it shows: mechanical plotting, predictable doings, and humor too obvious and trite to raise even a glimmer of a smile."
Another British-accented comedy-fantasy inspired by Wagner (Expecting Someone Taller, 1988, based on the Ring Cycle), here centering on the Flying Dutchman legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YE GODS! by Tom Holt
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 16, 1993

"Still: amusing stuff, especially for Anglophiles, and a vast improvement over the one-joke Flying Dutch (1992)."
What if the Olympian gods still existed and had merely been forced to go off and live in the sun? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BETTER MOUSETRAP by Tom Holt
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: May 1, 2009

"Funny and intriguingly complex—a difficult juggling act that Holt carries off with aplomb."
More humor with a British accent—from the prolific Holt, a sequel to The Portable Door (2004) and fourth in a series set in the same science-fantasy universe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN IT'S A JAR by Tom Holt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 17, 2013

"Shapeless, demented and frequently hilarious."
Another British-accented comic fantasy, a sequel to Doughnut (2013), whose entire plot revolves around the ancient riddle, the answer to which is the book's title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLONDE BOMBSHELL by Tom Holt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 18, 2010

"Tons of wonderful confetti, but the flashbulbs don't pop."
Riotous science-fiction social commentary, from the author of May Contain Traces of Magic (2009, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WALLED ORCHARD by Tom Holt
Released: June 20, 1991

"Holt has obviously found his niche."
In a sequel to Goatsong, the continuing history of Golden Age Athens from the point of view of a comic playwright who survives the Great Peloponnesian War—a free-floating romp that makes a hash out of classical Greece. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

WOMEN AND MATH, WOMEN AND SCIENCE, WOMEN AND STEM
by Leila Roy

Hello, my friends!

As I said earlier this week, I am COMPLETELY BURIED under a pile of reading for the Amelia Bloomer Project committee. At the moment, I’m halfway through Margot Lee Shetterly’s Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race, which I am LOVING. It’s a great ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

HOUSE ARREST by K.A.  Holt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"Easy to read and strong on sibling devotion, with frustratingly mixed messages about personal responsibility. (Verse fiction. 9-13)"
A boy works desperately to keep his sick little brother safe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WATCH ME by A.J. Holt
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 10, 1995

"From the opening grabber, this story is a model of plotting so dazzling it makes most other page-turners look positively anemic. (First printing of 110,000; Literary Guild/Mystery Guild featured alternate)"
A nail-biting first novel in which a rogue FBI agent, armed to the byte with cutting-edge computer weaponry, goes up against a clutch of equally well-heeled serial killers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EX-WIFE’S SURVIVAL GUIDE by Debby Holt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"A whimsical portrayal of life after separation."
An empty nester realizes that being dumped doesn't necessarily mean the end of romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 27, 2014

"An astute AIDS retrospective blended with contemporary updates on aggressive medical strategies."
A fascinating discourse on how medical science is zeroing in on an HIV vaccine after several anomalous triumphs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MRS. MALORY AND THE FESTIVAL MURDERS by Hazel Holt
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 21, 1993

"Traditionalists, however, will probably be most forgiving, particularly when they discover the appearance of their favorite murder weapon—the dented candlestick."
A village fàte, a stately home and its residents, and a literary curmudgeon all figure prominently in the latest adventure of West County author and amateur sleuth Sheila Malory (The Cruellest Month; Mrs. Malory Investigates). Read full book review >