Search Results: "Tom Knox"


BOOK REVIEW

MARKS OF CAIN by Tom Knox
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 10, 2010

"Weak and unpersuasive."
An unattached London lawyer and company follow a strange map to a dark secret. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Daniel Torres
by Daniel Torres, translated by Julie Simmons-Lynch, illustrated by Daniel Torres
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Then again, this book is supposed to be about art, so maybe the words don't matter. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Torres's first book is a big tribute to New York City and a little satire about the superficiality of the public's taste in art, wrapped in a story about a dinosaur. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST GODDESS by Tom Knox
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 6, 2012

"Knox does shed some light on actual 'hybridization' experiments ordered by Stalin, among other leaders. In the end, the Khmer massacres are too enormous in their inhumanity to function as the backdrop for a thriller.
"
After learning of the horrific crossbreeding experiments conducted by the Khmer Rouge during the '70s—and the international conspiracy of silence that surrounds those experiments still—a female archaeologist and male photographer have their lives threatened and their sanity questioned. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Lyle Leverich
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Affectionate and affecting, dense with arresting detail, likely to be definitive. (50 b&w photos, not seen) (First printing of 50,000; first serial to the New Yorker)"
Artistically and psychologically acute biography of the great American poet-playwright. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Tomie dePaola
by Tomie dePaola, illustrated by Tomie dePaola
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A delightfully offbeat vignette of boyish mischief reinforcing the bond between generations; dePaola's handsomely designed illustrations have unusual warmth here, subtly expressing the characters' affection. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another autobiographical story from dePaola, this time about his grandfather, who ingenuously explains that "We're named after each other, Tommy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Despite the pop-history trimmings, a solid résumé of everything anyone would want to know about this undeservedly neglected not-quite founding father."
Competent biography of Washington's talented young protégé, who commanded the artillery throughout the American Revolution and served as the nation's first Secretary of War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BABYLON RITE by Tom Knox
Released: May 7, 2013

"Knox begins with an interesting premise, which he first attacks with enthusiasm; unfortunately, he drags the story out well beyond tolerable limits and literally stomps it to death."
Another thriller about the Knights Templar results in a disappointing and amateurish effort to emulate a best-selling novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GENESIS SECRET by Tom Knox
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 30, 2009

"A well-wrought premise, undone by a series of lazy choices."
A newspaper reporter covering an archaeological dig must help catch a gang committing a string of grisly murders in Knox's debut thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DR. KNOX by Peter Spiegelman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 31, 2016

"The plot complications get more outlandish as they go, but the dark urban atmosphere keeps the book grounded in gritty reality."
A well-intentioned doctor working with prostitutes and junkies in the seedier parts of Los Angeles can get himself into big trouble. So learns the hero of Spiegelman's (Thick As Thieves, 2011, etc.) noir thriller as his noble aims make him the target of Russian terrorists and shady American business moguls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RONALD KNOX by Evelyn Waugh
Released: June 15, 1959

"He does more than record his subject's exterior life; he provides a record of a lost era — which World War I changed forever."
Although this biography was respectfully reviewed when it was first published in England — due, one suspects, as much to its author as to its subject — it was apparent that, for his countrymen, Ronald Knox, the man, remains essentially remote. Read full book review >