Search Results: "Tom Parker Bowles"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"In the spirit of Anthony Bourdain but without the sensationalistic glitz."
One gastronome's worldwide pursuit of perfect—and perfectly awful—cuisine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWORD OF DOOM by James Jennewein
ADVENTURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2010

"Developmental issues of identity, sexual innuendo and vividly described violence make this book appropriate for an older audience than the publisher-recommended range of eight to 12. (Fantasy. 11-14)"
After a visit to the king of their Viking realm, teen hero Dane, female warrior Astrid, village sage Lut and various supporters and rivals set off to rescue Dane's mother (who's been kidnapped by the villainous Godrek Whitecloak) and recover Odin's ring, an ancient artifact that is the source of never-ending treasure, from a cave guarded by a monstrous sea serpent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHIELD OF ODIN by James Jennewein
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"Although it can be overly detailed at times, boys especially will enjoy the pell-mell action, the wisenheimer narration and the belch-and-flatulence humor embedded in the adventurous tale. (Fantasy. 12-15)"
It's easy to see that this was written by two Hollywood screenwriters—readers can almost watch the CGI effects unfolding as they go. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 20, 1991

"A smart and knowing first-person accounting of the risks, rewards, profit, and inevitable losses attendant to the entrepreneurial life."
A nicely realized business memoir that suggests there re no glass ceilings for enterprising women. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2011

"Established fans will devour this excellent series finish. (Fantasy. 11-14)"
Thidreck the Terrifying, killed by Dane the Defiant, is back in action on an errand for the goddess Hel to find the Ship of Doom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MESSY JESSE by Paula Bowles
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2015

"A lighthearted story that toddlers will relate to. (Picture book. 2-6)"
A picture book about the joys of messy play. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT GOES UP by Paula Bowles
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"Bowles' visual message is strong, but it's too bad she relies on bromides in her prose. (Picture book. 4-7)"
It takes a village of curious children to cheer up a sad dragon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCARY MARY by Paula Bowles
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"The glib ending notwithstanding, Mary's humorous tactics make her one of the more appealing barnyard brats around. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Animals fly the coop when Scary Mary ruffles her feathers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"About a quarter of the collection is dead wood—chat about agents, contracts, fees—but read in one sitting, it's a fascinating, tonic history of the counterculture in what was for a time the American century. (Photographs)"
``Places have always been more important to me than people,'' Bowles (b. 1910) confesses in one of more than 400 letters collected here by Miller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORIES OF PAUL BOWLES by Paul Bowles
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2001

"Bowles was a great writer whom many readers may find hard to stomach (imagine a collaboration among Tennessee Williams, André Gide, and the Marquis de Sade). Those attuned to his hammer-blow rhetoric and nihilistic lyricism should find this generous volume just about irresistible."
Lavish first collected edition of Bowles's harsh, unsparing short fiction—published in conjunction with Ecco's 30th anniversary: 62 elegantly wrought, compact nightmare visions, including the contents of classic earlier volumes, The Delicate Prey (1950) and The Time of Friendship (1967). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SHELTERING SKY by Paul Bowles
Released: Dec. 5, 1949

"A strange book, bitter, clever, for an intellectual audience."
A first novel, although Bowles' short stories may be familiar to the little magazine reader, this has some of the nervous brilliance, atmospheric effectiveness—without the imagery—of the early Prokosch. Read full book review >