Search Results: "Tom Slaughter"


BOOK REVIEW

SLAUGHTER by Elmer Kelton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 1992

"Kelton's spare, unadorned, and sophisticated writing gives intense pleasure without ever calling attention to itself."
An Englishman, a tough girl from Ohio, a cowboy, and a Comanche come together in a search for the last of the great herds of bison—in another outstanding western by the author of Honor at Daybreak (1991). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOAT WORKS by Tom Slaughter
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 29, 2012

"No need for a life jacket; all these vessels glide smoothly into port. (Board book. 1-3)"
When you sail away on these seas, the vessel can be any you choose. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE, TWO, THREE by Tom Slaughter
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

For children at the very dawn of numeracy, Slaughter's paper collages offers one-to-ten counting (and modern art) practice on a set of commonplace, easily recognizable items—an apple, eyeglasses, buttons, beach balls, and the like—all rendered with utmost simplicity in bright primary colors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Daniel Torres
by Daniel Torres, translated by Julie Simmons-Lynch, illustrated by Daniel Torres
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Then again, this book is supposed to be about art, so maybe the words don't matter. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Torres's first book is a big tribute to New York City and a little satire about the superficiality of the public's taste in art, wrapped in a story about a dinosaur. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Lyle Leverich
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Affectionate and affecting, dense with arresting detail, likely to be definitive. (50 b&w photos, not seen) (First printing of 50,000; first serial to the New Yorker)"
Artistically and psychologically acute biography of the great American poet-playwright. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Tomie dePaola
by Tomie dePaola, illustrated by Tomie dePaola
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A delightfully offbeat vignette of boyish mischief reinforcing the bond between generations; dePaola's handsomely designed illustrations have unusual warmth here, subtly expressing the characters' affection. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another autobiographical story from dePaola, this time about his grandfather, who ingenuously explains that "We're named after each other, Tommy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLAUGHTER MUSIC by Russell James
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 19, 1995

"If they are, their family reunions must be worthy of those of the other James brothers, Jesse and Frank."
Whether or not he's related to Bill (Club, above), Russell James is equally a connoisseur of British lowlife. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMING THROUGH SLAUGHTER by Michael Ondaatje
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 25, 1997

"That's his triumph; his downfall is that, despite the lusty milieu, the freewheeling passions, and the vivid, fact-based characters (like Bellocq, photographer of prostitutes and self-arsonist), Buddy Bolden's life never seems as real, immediate, or important as the elaborate variations on it."
Ondaatje is a Canadian poet (the stunning Collected Works of Billy the Kid), and his first full-length stretch of prose is one of the more successful resolutions of a poet/novelist identity crisis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EATS by Marthe Jocelyn
by Marthe Jocelyn, illustrated by Tom Slaughter
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 9, 2007

"A good choice for storytime sharing. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The creators of One Some Many (2004) are back, this time with a concept book about what different animals eat. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE SOME MANY by Marthe Jocelyn
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 8, 2004

"Too bad it tries to be so many things. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A combination concept and counting book, this would work better if it were one or the other. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PURE SLAUGHTER VALUE by Robert Bingham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Still, there's enough distinctive work here to indicate the appearance of a disturbing new talent."
A promising if somewhat repetitive first gathering of short fiction, charting the rather aimless, amoral behavior of generally well-to-do twenty- and thirty-somethings. Read full book review >