Search Results: "Tom Zoellner"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 3, 2014

"Great for fans of Paul Theroux's railroad journeys, except that Zoellner isn't anywhere near as ill-tempered, and he has a better command of social history. A pleasure for literate travelers."
A rousing around-the-world paean to the rumble of the rails by accomplished journalist Zoellner (A Safeway in Arizona: What the Gabrielle Giffords Shooting Tells Us About the Grand Canyon State and Life in America, 2011, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2006

"Lives up in every way to the power of its almost magical subject."
Sparkling debut from adventuresome journalist Zoellner, who traveled the world to tell the dirty, glorious and sometime bloody story of diamonds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 2, 2012

"A sure-to-be-controversial, troubling tale of the wages of fear on the body politic."
Investigative journalist and native Arizonian Zoellner (Uranium: War, Energy, and the Rock that Shaped the World, 2009, etc.) combines memoir, history and reportage in an attempt to understand mass murder and the attempted assassination of a friend in Tucson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 9, 2009

"A rich journalistic account."
Lively, often disturbing history of the largest atom in nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Daniel Torres
by Daniel Torres, translated by Julie Simmons-Lynch, illustrated by Daniel Torres
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Then again, this book is supposed to be about art, so maybe the words don't matter. (Picture book. 3-8)"
Torres's first book is a big tribute to New York City and a little satire about the superficiality of the public's taste in art, wrapped in a story about a dinosaur. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Lyle Leverich
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Affectionate and affecting, dense with arresting detail, likely to be definitive. (50 b&w photos, not seen) (First printing of 50,000; first serial to the New Yorker)"
Artistically and psychologically acute biography of the great American poet-playwright. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM by Tomie dePaola
by Tomie dePaola, illustrated by Tomie dePaola
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"A delightfully offbeat vignette of boyish mischief reinforcing the bond between generations; dePaola's handsomely designed illustrations have unusual warmth here, subtly expressing the characters' affection. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another autobiographical story from dePaola, this time about his grandfather, who ingenuously explains that "We're named after each other, Tommy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Tom Thorneval by Cornelius Elmore Addison
Released: Aug. 8, 2015

"A charming introduction to a world of fairy creatures, featuring a good-hearted narrator who grows into a better person."
In this fairy tale for middle-grade readers, a misfit dream maker goes on a quest for riches and finds himself on a completely different path toward self-worth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Tom's personal and professional relationships with Barnum make this biography a superb complement to Candace Fleming's The Great and Only Barnum (2009). (endnotes, bibliography, index) (Biography. 10-14)"
Long before the Internet, 24-hour news cycles and social networking, the 25-inch-tall General Tom Thumb was a household name in both the United States and Europe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM FINGER by Gillian McClure
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"An erratic adventure with compelling moments. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In McClure's (Selkie, 1999, etc.) wintry and whimsical tale a girl mourns her dead cat in spite of her brother's protests. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOM CAT by Noah Woods
by Noah Woods, illustrated by Noah Woods
ANIMALS
Released: May 25, 2004

"Bouncily expressive Tom is winningly colored in gray, black, and magenta; other visuals are less interesting. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A computer-generated cat interacts with parents and objects in this tale with a confused message. Read full book review >