Search Results: "Torey L. Hayden"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 29, 1991

"Suspenseful, compelling, and offering welcome insights into troubled children and how a gifted and compassionate professional treats them."
A gripping true-life horror story from child- psychologist/teacher Hayden (Just Another Kid, 1988, etc.) about her growing conviction that a child in her special education class was abused by a group of adults, possibly a satanic cult. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TIGER'S CHILD by Torey Hayden
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1995

"An effective chronicle of a relationship full of potholes that nonetheless brings both student and teacher further along the road to maturity."
Sheila, the mute, abused six-year-old protagonist of Hayden's bestselling One Child (not reviewed), returns in a fast- paced, real-life narrative that rewards the reader with a happy ending. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VERY WORST THING by Torey Hayden
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2003

"Despite these flaws, this is a well-wrought problem novel for the younger set. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Twelve-year-old David, passed among foster homes for as long as he can remember, has never had anything or anyone of his own except his sister, who is now in juvenile hall. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 20, 2002

"Compelling, well written, and extremely moving."
The unsettling story of a mute, nearly catatonic seven-year-old in her special-education classroom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAYDEN HEYER by D. Perdue Henderson
Released: Dec. 18, 2012

"A well-imagined premise with a flat narrative arc."
In Henderson's (Branded, 2011) YA novel, an unhappy, insecure 16-year-old meets a pair of "gorgeous" twin boys who reveal her true purpose in life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TINSEL FOR TOREY by Eden Joise
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 27, 2017

"A kids' story with good intentions, despite some stumbles."
A girl with cancer gets a sparkly Christmas wig from a friend in this illustrated children's book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Written too soon after the event to stifle self-dramatization—or to touch on the tenuous relationship between actual law practice and classroom drilling—this will be of interest only to masochistic, prospective law students but may mislead them, since Harvard's enormous classes, hothouse ambiance, and rock-rigid first-year requirements are less than representative of current options in legal education."
Like the hero of the book-then-film, The Paper Chase, Turow got all frazzled—smoking, drinking, making and breaking psychiatric appointments—by his first year at Harvard Law School (1975-76), the year with all the tough courses, heavy pressures, competitive snarls, and think-like-a-lawyer angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY L. by Marguerite Duras
Released: May 15, 1989

Duras (The Lover; The War, etc.) here offers a wise, graceful book, at once modern in its self-consciousness and classic in its clarity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 29, 1993

"An unsparing and perceptive briefing on a pocketbook issue whose complexities appear beyond the grasp of mass media."
A journalist's informed audit of the factors that brought America's S&Ls to grief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOROTHY L. SAYERS by Barbara Reynolds
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Fans of Lord Peter may feel let down. (Thirty b&w photographs)"
Another ``interim report'' on the life (1893-1957) of the creator of Lord Peter Wimsey and reluctant Christian apologist, by a longtime friend, completer of Sayers's translation of Dante and author of The Passionate Intellect: Dorothy L. Sayers' Encounter with Dante (1989- -not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 11, 1992

"Bibliographies; index. (Biography. 9+)"
An impressively researched account of Baum's variegated career as writer, actor, impresario, filmmaker, and devoted family man, whose health and finances were both often precarious. Read full book review >