Search Results: "Tricia Tusa"


BOOK REVIEW

FOLLOW ME by Tricia Tusa
Kirkus Star
by Tricia Tusa, illustrated by Tricia Tusa
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 18, 2011

"A glorious visual meditation on light, color and home for even the smallest child and artist. (Picture book. 4-9)"
This book starts with the cover, a picture of a small girl with a large braid getting onto a swing under a tree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SISTERS by Tricia Tusa
by Tricia Tusa, illustrated by Tricia Tusa
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Her people are lumpy, long, endearing and—memorable. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Another warmly wacky book by the creator of Maebelle's Suitcase (1991). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT'S MONDAY, MRS. JOLLY BONES! by Warren Hanson
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 19, 2013

"Amelia Bedelia may come to mind, but Mrs. Jolly Bones' unconventional behavior reflects her originality and flair rather than a lack of intelligence; would that more people flaunt their individuality…but maybe not in the toilet. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Mrs. Jolly Bones has a chore for every day of the week…but readers can be sure they've never done chores quite the way she does. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 2008

"Tusa's simple line drawings capture a snail's-eye view of the world of tree, leaf and bird, and bestow a droll sincerity on the faces of Avon and Edward. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Invertebrate and inadvertent punsters Avon the snail and Edward the ant explore new territory: storytelling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROBLEM WITH THE PUDDLES by Kate Feiffer
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 24, 2009

"Tusa's charming illustrations can't rescue this ill-conceived venture. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Two children and their fractious parents head from their vacation home to the city and accidentally leave their two dogs behind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"The compact, simple text is readable in a large font with great spacing; the small trim size and Tusa's graceful, whimsical black-and-white drawings suit the contents perfectly. (Fiction. 4-10)"
Avon, a snail whose reading tastes run to adventure, longs for a real journey of his own. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEAL OF THE STARS by Dana Jensen
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 20, 2012

"Ambitious but flawed. (Picture book/poetry. 4-7)"
Jensen's debut yields 15 skinny poems, 10 of which are meant to be read from bottom to top. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BALLAD OF VALENTINE by Alison Jackson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2002

"Just right for Valentine's Day, this is funny and satisfying without being too sugary. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Clever interplay of text and art makes this ballad more than a simple love story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MRS. SPITZER’S GARDEN by Edith Pattou
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2001

"Lucky the reader, of any age, who had a Mrs. Spitzer. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A very loving book, a tribute really, to the teachers of the world and beyond them to all people who nurture children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VIOLIN FOR ELVA by Mary Lyn Ray
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"Though putting off a dream for decades is a foreign idea to most children, they should respond to the lilt of the words and the energy and charm of the pictures. (Picture book. 6-10)"
A long-deferred dream of music comes true. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LO-JACK AND THE PIRATES by William H. Hooks
ADVENTURE
Released: June 3, 1991

"Good fun, ably visualized in Tusa's energetic art. (Easy reader. 5-9)"
A ``Bank Street Ready-to-Read'' (Level 3) that combines the Amelia Bedelia variety of comic literal-mindedness and an adventure story with a satisfying final twist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FAMILY REUNION by Tricia Tusa
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 20, 1993

"Pure comedy—especially Tusa's wonderfully pointed cartoon caricatures of family types in full, overebullient swing. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Like a suburban version of The Relatives Came, the Beneadas throng in, bearing casseroles, drinks, towering cakes, a trumpet, an accordion, a violin; they turn up the lights and settle down to regale each other with stories, photograph people they almost remember, exchange confidences, and commune with themselves by meditating or exercising. Read full book review >