Search Results: "Trish Cook"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2003

"All in all, a well-paced, nuanced contribution to the history of exploration."
A richly detailed life of perhaps the greatest maritime explorer in history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A REALLY AWESOME MESS by Trish Cook
YOUNG ADULT
Released: July 23, 2013

"Funny and fast-moving—but too much of the healing rings hollow. (Fiction. 14-18)"
A group of teens at a live-in institution for troubled young people bond, pull off a caper and overcome their issues in an amusing but overly rosy two-narrator tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTES FROM THE BLENDER by Brendan Halpin
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 26, 2010

"Dec's compassionate Aunt Sarah, whose Unitarian Universalist youth group becomes a refuge for both teens, brings yet more wit and kindness to this sweet, emotional, but never hokey mix. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Two stepsiblings-to-be narrate this charming, funny and surprisingly touching family story in alternating chapters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRISH TRASH ROLLERGIRL OF MARS by Jessica Abel
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"It's a bit too ambitious, but readers should find it intriguing enough to be hopeful about subsequent volumes. (Graphic science fiction. 12 & up)"
Living on Mars, an adolescent girl dreams of leaving her farm and joining the hoverderby. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COOK IT! by Georgie Birkett
illustrated by Georgie Birkett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2010

"All have a thinner-than-usual page stock that suits them, appropriately, to toddlers. (Board book. 2-4)"
A cheery little girl and her dad plan a shopping trip, go to the grocery store (by bike), purchase ingredients and go home to make pizza for the whole family (a biracial one, in a nice touch). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIRL COOK by Hannah McCouch
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2003

"Cheerfully raunchy first novel by a former chef, with some memorable moments and authentic atmosphere."
If you can't take the heat. . . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUTLAW COOK by John Thorne
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"Both substantive and refreshingly quirky: Thorne's food- writing can feed your head and clear it of the prevailing burble."
Billed here as ``an iconoclastic eater,'' Thorne—author of a food newsletter and a 1987 anthology drawn from its pages, both titled Simple Cooking—is so far from the usual run of gushing food-writers as to make M.F.K. Fisher (reviewed above) look a little precious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 4, 2005

"A polished and touching piece of work."
Tony Hendra's daughter explains why she went public with the story of his incestuous sexual abuse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO COOK A TART by Nina Killham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Sophisticated, shameful fun: Killham, a former food writer for the Washington Post, knows how to lay a nice table and can offer a rich feast for famished readers."
A sinfully deliciously debut about the travails of a gourmet cook trapped in a fat-phobic world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

The Incompetent Cook by Ivor Thomas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 7, 2013

"A diverting travelogue with some admirable writing but little arc or narrative theme beyond assorted recipes."
World traveler Idris Granger doesn't cook well, but in Thomas' collection of short stories, he collects recipes for different delicious dishes everywhere he goes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COOK-A-DOODLE-DOO! by Janet Stevens
Released: April 1, 1999

"Stevens never misses an opportunity for expressiveness in her characters; her inclusion of funny details adds more silliness to the story, from the overturned copper-pot hat on Turtle to the T-rex measuring cup. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A cross between a picture book take-off of the story of the Little Red Hen and a cooking lesson on the making of strawberry shortcake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 15, 1994

"An intriguing idea ruined by unfortunate oversights."
Kempston, a self-taught cook and former manager of a country hotel, has dissected the eating and cooking processes; he believes that a scientific understanding can free cooks from recipe slavery. Read full book review >