Search Results: "Tristan Egolf"


BOOK REVIEW

KORNWOLF by Tristan Egolf
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 9, 2006

"An unholy mess, but a ride well worth taking. And do look for the Kornwolf sooner or later at your nearby multiplex."
Multiple incarnations of the title beast terrorize rural "Pennsyltucky" in this raucous third, and last novel from the late (1971-2005) Midwestern author. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKIRT AND THE FIDDLE by Tristan Egolf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Full-tilt madcap antics from a lean and mean fabulist of the first degree."
A down-and-out violinist makes the worst of his fall from grace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LORD OF THE BARNYARD by Tristan Egolf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1999

"Egolf has a real subject and the ability and will to write about it passionately."
The contrary spirits of Sinclair Lewis and Thomas Pynchon, as well as of John Kennedy Toole, hover over this unruly first novel: a satirical mock-epic of Middle America and, at least in part, a boldly imagined allegory of the struggles of American labor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRISTAN CHORD by Bryan Magee
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 7, 2001

"Clearly aware that intellectual influences are only one stream flowing into great operas, Magee doesn't overstate the significance of such currents, yet his mellow, lucid interpretation of how they informed and nourished Wagner's libretti is highly persuasive."
A sound and highly readable exploration of the composer's philosophical milieu. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRISTAN AND ISEULT by Rosemary Sutcliff
Released: Oct. 1, 1971

"With all the vagaries of the romance and the conventions of the code it has a strong appeal, but it's not the real thing."
In presenting stories from the past, Rosemary Sutcliff has an unusual capacity for retaining the flavor of the original while discarding antiquated syntax and inconsequential detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Tristan Bay Accord by Lizzie Newell
FICTION & LITERATURE

"An often engaging tale of a confining society, rendered with love."
In Newell's (The Fisherman and the Sperm Thief, 2016, etc.) second Fenria sci-fi novel, a woman tries to legally establish her own clan.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRISTAN BETRAYAL by Robert Ludlum
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 28, 2003

"Nurse, another lap robe, there's a good girl."
From the ranks of dead bestselling authors comes yet another probable bestseller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 12, 2012

"An atypical YA journey into South African culture, featuring rowdy, supernatural shenanigans."
In Greenway's young-adult debut, a South African student learns of rough times ahead from an evil native god, but the boy has powerful spirit-friends to help him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNUSUAL LIFE OF TRISTAN SMITH by Peter Carey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 1995

"An ambitious book decked out with lots of imaginative finery, this picaresque tale promises the bite of an Orwellian satire but never delivers."
Noted for novels that subtly skew reality, Australian Booker Prize winner Carey (The Tax Inspector, 1991, etc.) now invents countries for his protagonist to illuminate in a story that only flirts with the big issues it raises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 6, 1991

"Good dialogue and great Jonesian prose, so dense you can walk on it and watch your tracks fill up with sea water."
Companion volume to Jones's Saga of a Wayward Sailor (1979) and not a continuation of this season's To Venture Further (p. 1062). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FERAL CITIES by Tristan Donovan
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2015

"A clear demonstration that the world's cities are full of nonhuman life, best read in small doses, say a chapter at a time on one's daily commute to and from the city."
Exploration of the creatures that share our urban centers, including giant house-eating snails in Miami, leopards in Mumbai, wild pigs in Berlin and red foxes in London. Read full book review >