Search Results: "Truman Capote"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 28, 1949

"The market is obvious, from his first."
Doubtful- yes- for the critical reception accorded Truman Capote last year- and the sensational success of his first book will establish acceptance, in many quarters, for this, his second. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OTHER VOICES, OTHER ROOMS by Truman Capote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 1947

"The 'journey' progresses from uneasiness to madness, as Joel sees his father, hopelessly invalided and speechless, and learns from Randolph of the shooting which had crippled his father, and watches the gradual deterioration of Randolph, etc. Grotesque, experimental, for a limited audience of initiates, who may, possibly, have encountered this writer first in a Martha Foley collection of 'Bests.'"
A distorted, hallucinatory and—for the common reader—only dubiously intelligible interlude in the childhood of a young boy, Joel Knox, his "journey through dying rooms" as he leaves New Orleans to find his father at Scully's Landing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COLLECTED STORIES OF TRUMAN CAPOTE by Truman Capote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 28, 2004

"Though the late Capote became a pathetic self-caricature, the one who wrote these brilliant stories deserves to be remembered. (Also see Gerald Clarke's Too Brief a Treat: The Letters of Truman Capote, p. 720.)"
Twenty stories that reflect the late (1924-84) journalist and storyteller's graceful vacillations among urban horror stories, Southern Gothic local color and melodrama, and limpid memory pieces. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE CHRISTMAS by Truman Capote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1983

"A fair enough little sliver of autobiography, complete with slipcase and outsized price-tag—but more poignant as a reminder of Capote's waning productivity than as a story proper."
With just 21 pages of large-print text, this autobiographical snippet (which originally appeared in Ladles' Home Journal) is even briefer than A Christmas Memory or The Thanksgiving Visitor; more crucially, perhaps, it's far less cozy than Capote's previous childhood stories—with only brief mention of Truman's surrogate mother, elderly cousin Miss Sook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN COLD BLOOD by Truman Capote
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 7, 1965

"There may never have been a perfect crime, but if there ever has been a perfect reconstruction of one, surely this must be it."
"There's got to be something wrong with somebody who'd do a thing like that." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUSIC FOR CHAMELEONS by Truman Capote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 11, 1980

"Overall, however, it's a depressing gathering—and, if Capote genuinely believes that 'Handcarved Coffins' is better written than In Cold Blood, the prospects are hardly very promising for his long-awaited, promised-soon novel, Answered Prayers."
A distressingly thin and uneven new collection from a man who's clearly been having a terrible time at the typewriter; in a painful introduction, Capote reviews his whole career and tells how he recently realized the limitations of his previous work and arrived at a new style—first-person narration, severe and minimal, heavy on transcript-like presentation of conversations. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANSWERED PRAYERS by Truman Capote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 21, 1987

"But the overall effect, somewhat wearying even at novella length, is shiny and shallow—with nothing to suggest that a completed Answered Prayers would have been anything like a masterpiece."
Published in Esquire in the mid-1970's but never before in book form, here are the three extant chapters from Capote's notorious, never-finished "non-fiction novel" about his society/literary friends—part roman á clef, part naked gossip using real names. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMER CROSSING by Truman Capote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 25, 2005

"A wonderful discovery for the scholars, who will find Capote in possession, in his early 20s, of a confident voice and fine storytelling skills. But Capote is for readers, and here they will find a pleasing—if surely dated—entertainment."
A work of literary archaeology that reckons, in a roundabout way, as Capote's debut—save that he put it aside to work on Other Voices, Other Rooms, and this elegant, brief novel was lost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EARLY STORIES OF TRUMAN CAPOTE by Truman Capote
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Students of both Capote and the short story will find this instructive and entertaining—and, if somewhat unformed still, very readable all the same."
Gathering of the great American prose stylist's earliest pieces, published for the first time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THANKSGIVING VISITOR by Truman Capote
FICTION
Released: Nov. 21, 1968

"This brief tale will appear in McCalls."
Were it not that the gently luminous features of the brilliant actress Geraldine Page, who appeared in Capote's Christmas Memory on TV last year, haunt this latest fictional memoir like a benign ghost, one might balk at the author's slide into commercial sentimentality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRILOGY by Truman Capote
Released: Sept. 29, 1969

"That might give it a special (if limited) fourth audience."
This book is a case study of the process by which these stories found expression in three different media." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 1, 1973

Capote thinks of himself as "a planet wanderer" — a man who keeps musing along no matter the consequences (Gide told him, remember the Arab proverb: "The dogs bark, but the caravan moves on") and these selections from his writings represent where he's been, "a prose map, a written geography of my life over the last three decades, more or less from 1942 to 1972. Read full book review >