Search Results: "Tudor Parfitt"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 2004

"A passable study of biblical history and comparative mythology."
One of the "enduring motifs underlying Western views of the wider world" gets a scholarly assessment, thanks to British journalist Parfitt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"EWSLUGD: the best in adventure-scholarship. (Photos—not seen.)"
A haunting history-cum-travelogue, as Parfitt (Hebrew & Jewish Studies/Univ. of London) sleuths out the claims of the Lemba of South Africa, a black people who believe themselves to be the legendary lost tribe of Israel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREAT CORGIVILLE KIDNAPPING by Tasha Tudor
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Julia Child, Gertrude Stein, and others who will not be known to children, but Tudor's devotees will love this caper, and others will want to go unearth the first work. (Picture book. 7-10)"
A delectable companion to The Corgiville Fair (1971), in which Tudor employs conversational prose to revisit the pastoral setting and farmyard inhabitants of the original. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIDING by Tudor Humphries
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A wise, gently humorous book, perfect for all those who have ever attempted to run away and have been only too glad to have their plans thwarted. (Picture book. 2-5)"
The preschooler who narrates this story finds that whenever the situation appears out of control, there's only one answer: to hidebehind the couch, in the hidey hole under the stairs, under the dinner table, the bed, the bedcovers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AROUND THE YEAR by Tasha Tudor
Released: Oct. 31, 1957

"Here, the pleasantly old-fashioned character of her work now appears in an almost Currier and Ives vein. 'January brings us ... coasting, Taffy pulls and apple roasting.' Two double spreads illustrate each month while simple rhymed lines describe it. For children to whom the calendar is still a confusing complexity, this will fill a need. Period and pastoral, this is a nostalgic view of country children of long ago... around the year."
The quaint and careful, delicately colored paintings which have charmed Tasha Tudor's followers in earlier books mark each month of the year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DOLLS' CHRISTMAS by Tasha Tudor
Released: June 15, 1950

"Much combing and brushing and dressing — with a party."
A lovely, pretty book for little girls who love dolls and dollhouses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMANDA AND THE BEAR by Tasha Tudor
Released: Aug. 16, 1951

"Neat, pretty full-color Nineties pictures for a predictable Tudor market."
For the cult, another bright little picture book, based on the true story of a little girl who kept a bear cub as a pet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CORGIVILLE CHRISTMAS by Tasha Tudor
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 31, 2003

"Those who love Tudor's reverent homage to yesteryear will enjoy spending time in snowy Corgiville for the holiday season. (Picture book. 4-7)"
An old-fashioned Christmas season in a New England village is the theme of Tudor's latest installment about Corgiville, her fictional town inhabited by her favorite Corgi dogs, as well as by rabbits, cats, and chickens. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OTTER MOON by Tudor Humphries
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"First-rate. (Picture book. 6-9)"
An otter with the soul of a poet goes on a moonlit quest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNOW BEFORE CHRISTMAS by Tasha Tudor
Released: Oct. 2, 1941

"Good read aloud material for holiday time, from picture book age up."
Once again lovely pictures, with soft coloring, and this time a more clear cut job of reproduction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LINSEY WOOLSEY by Tasha Tudor
Released: June 15, 1946

"Stocking book format; perishable white background jacket and pale yellow board binding."
Another in the series of calico books, which include Pumpkin Moonshine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THISTLY B by Tasha Tudor
Released: Sept. 8, 1949

"Don't forget that lots of adults collect Tasha Tudor for themselves."
Thistly B, who had been raised in a teacup, was a beautiful yellow canary belonging to a little brother and sister. Read full book review >