Search Results: "Twesigye Jackson Kaguri"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 14, 2010

"A slowly unfolding, moving journey of turning beliefs into actions."
A chronicle of the humanitarian efforts by a Ugandan native schooled in the West, addressing poverty and the ravages of AIDS in Africa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GAGGLE SISTERS RIVER TOUR by Chris Jackson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"The kooky, droll watercolors are a decided plus, but it is the dryly humorous, theatrical text that keeps the story going strong to the end, as readers applaud Dorothy's saintly patience and try to figure a way to reach into the pages to strangle Sadie. (Picture book. 4-6)"
A prima donna goose who practically defines pomposity gets a glimmering that her entourage of one—her sister—may well be indispensable to her success. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIMI’S DADA CATIFESTO by Shelley Jackson
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2010

"Completely spectacular. (Picture book. 7 & up)"
This engaging picture book delivers a pleasurable story, dazzling artwork and a fascinating introduction to Dadaism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOPHIA, THE ALCHEMIST’S DOG by Shelley Jackson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Truly magical. (Fiction. 7-10)"
Sophia's master is alchemist to the King, who gives him a yearly allowance to turn lead into gold, something the little brown dog's master has yet to accomplish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GAGGLE SISTERS SING AGAIN by Chris Jackson
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"The watercolors, on the other hand, soothe as they transport readers to the Wriggle River. (Picture book. 4-7)"
This second go-round for Jackson's Gaggle Sisters, in a proposed trilogy, is curiously disjointed, but maintains the rhythm of their musical river tour. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A COW’S ALFALFA-BET by Woody Jackson
ABC BOOKS
Released: Sept. 22, 2003

"The pictures in this artist's showcase are tableaus that tell no stories, but reflective viewers may catch a hint of the slow rhythms of a vanishing way of life. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Vermont artist Jackson, best known for the distinctive cows decorating cartons of Ben and Jerry's ice cream, strews a string of rural landscapes with similarly eyeless, stylized Holsteins in this series of New England farmscapes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWEETLY by Jackson Pearce
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: Aug. 23, 2011

"Not Pearce's best. (Fantasy. 14 & up)"
An uneven retelling of "Hansel and Gretel" swaps witches for werewolves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2008

"The straightforward simplicity of these well-intentioned musings might be helpful for young adults with spiritual longings who are suspicious of organized religion. Mature readers would do better rereading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance."
A TV producer embarks upon a transcontinental quest for spiritual enlightenment with a childhood friend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AT HOME IN THE WORLD by Michael Jackson
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Jackson's ethnography stands on its own as an exploration of the main theme, but his poetry and his philosophizing are often arbitrary and a bit invasive."
A disconcerting blend of ethnography, poetry, and philosophy that attempts to answer the question of what it means to be at home in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 20, 2011

"Ultimately reads like an undergraduate 'what-if' essay—passionately argued but highly improbable."
Businessman and former Libertarian presidential candidate Jackson argues a polarized America needs a divorce from itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 25, 1992

"Though strongest in its earlier chapters, when Jackson's raw material is at its most dramatic, this wonderful self-portrait of emotional life in the mother zone provides solace and surprises from start to finish."
An account of becoming and being a mother that reads like a novel and is as intimate as a poem. Read full book review >