Search Results: "Ursula K. Le Guin"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 11, 2016

"In a review of Kent Haruf's Benediction, Le Guin remarks on a character's 'humor so dry it's almost ether.' That praise applies to Le Guin as well in a collection notable for its wit, unvarnished opinions, and passion."
Collected nonfiction by the prolific, multiaward-winning writer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POWERS by Ursula K. Le Guin
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Billed as a 'companion' to Gifts (2004) and Voices (2006), in its musing on this power of story, it complements them beautifully, though readers hoping to reacquaint themselves with characters met in the first two novels will find themselves disappointed until the very end. (Fiction. YA)"
Reared in slavery, Gavir knows and understands his place in the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRE AND STONE by Ursula K. Le Guin
Released: March 13, 1989

"Le Guin deftly brings out the humor in her ironical story; Marshall, with a remarkably sure hand for a first book, uses authoritative line and perspective and rich, bright color to bring Le Guin's imaginary world to dramatic life."
Once upon a time there was a country that lived in fear of a dragon." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 13, 1988

"Her often brilliant fiction scores higher by setting aside the didacticism."
A very mixed bag indeed, comprising 36 talks and essays (1976-88) and 17 reviews (1977-86), ranging from travel pieces and literary discussions to feminism, commencement addresses, and social-consciousness-raisers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COMPASS ROSE by Ursula K. Le Guin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 21, 1982

"But, for the most part, there are inexhaustible playings and seeings and imaginings—from a shrewd and various writer who can think something through till it seems to cohere in the mind's eye."
As a guide to sailors this book is not to be trusted," remarks Ursula Le Guin of her latest collection of stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TELLING by Ursula K. Le Guin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The usual mesmerizing Le Guin narrative and intensity of concept, but too one-sided to provoke resonance or plumb the depths."
Le Guin's latest (Unlocking the Air, 1996, etc.) belongs to her Hainish cycle—Hain being the planet that originally seeded Earth, and many other worlds, with the human species; now the Hainish are revisiting lost worlds and drawing them into the benevolent Ekumene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEESE WEBSTER by Ursula K. Le Guin
Released: Sept. 10, 1979

"Not the brilliant parable that might have been expected, but sound and expertly spun like any fine web."
A spider with a creative bent, Leese breaks away from family tradition to weave webs inspired by the paintings and carpets in the deserted palace where she lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ORSINIAN TALES by Ursula K. Le Guin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 29, 1976

"One hopes that Le Guin will return to this bleak, lovely land soon and often."
These eleven interwoven stories, written over a period of many years, reflect Le Guin's characteristic feeling for what some call "background": the persistent accumulation of detail about a society's past, present, geography, ecology that give her sf worlds such effortless dimension. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WORD FOR WORLD IS FOREST by Ursula K. Le Guin
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 12, 1976

"Lesser Le Guin, but often impressive."
Terran logging interests vs. the gentle natives of Athshe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEBULA AWARD STORIES ELEVEN by Ursula K. Le Guin
Released: Feb. 16, 1976

"There are some good things here, but they don't add up to a balance of approaches and themes."
Seven 1975 Nebula winners and runners-up, together with Peter Nicholls' nice but slapdash survey of the year in sf and Vonda N. McIntyre's shallow ruminations on the state of the art. P. J. Plauger does a wry and dry turn on the notion of immortal youth; Harlan Ellison works out a Doppelganger situation with negligent finesse. Read full book review >